AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

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AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Rob Weir
I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
all volunteers should probably do.

Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
volunteers to take.

Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?

One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
"stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.

For example:

Level 1 tasks:

1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the Apache Way

2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums

3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
rules and folders

4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette

5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself

6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
and indicate that you have completed Level 1.


Level 2 tasks:

1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode

2) Readings on decision making at Apache

3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project

4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
etc.

5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
now completed Level 2.

Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
new test case.

Is any one interested in helping with this?

-Rob
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

jan iversen
That is a BIG +++1 from me.

Being a new contributors, I could have saved a lot of "stupid" questions,
had I had a reading list.

I have spent quite a number of hours (and that of others too) finding
things, everybody knows.

It would be good to have 1 wiki page with a suggested reading and items to
do (get a wiki account etc.). That page can then later have specialized sub
pages depending on the type of volunteer.

What really bothers me, is that I waste time for many others, who are very
polite in helping me get over the first start....with many new volunteers
(assuming I am on average) that is a lot of time, that could have been
spent on more fruitful things.

I agree however that the wording of the page should be choose well, words
like "suggested reading" are far better for those who take things
personally.

I will gladly review such a page :-)

jan.

On 19 October 2012 18:17, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
> all volunteers should probably do.
>
> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> volunteers to take.
>
> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
>
> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>
> For example:
>
> Level 1 tasks:
>
> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the Apache
> Way
>
> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>
> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> rules and folders
>
> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>
> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>
> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>
>
> Level 2 tasks:
>
> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>
> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>
> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>
> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
> etc.
>
> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> now completed Level 2.
>
> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
> new test case.
>
> Is any one interested in helping with this?
>
> -Rob
>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Rob Weir
On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:27 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]> wrote:

> That is a BIG +++1 from me.
>
> Being a new contributors, I could have saved a lot of "stupid" questions,
> had I had a reading list.
>
> I have spent quite a number of hours (and that of others too) finding
> things, everybody knows.
>
> It would be good to have 1 wiki page with a suggested reading and items to
> do (get a wiki account etc.). That page can then later have specialized sub
> pages depending on the type of volunteer.
>

Right.  This is the idea.

> What really bothers me, is that I waste time for many others, who are very
> polite in helping me get over the first start....with many new volunteers
> (assuming I am on average) that is a lot of time, that could have been
> spent on more fruitful things.
>

Well, I must admit that your recent contributions, enthusiasm and
questions have prompted these thoughts.  Please don't be bothered that
you have questions.  This is getting us in the right direction and
pointing out where we need to improve.  This is good.  We all need to
keep a good attitude about this.  And I think so far we're doing this
well.

> I agree however that the wording of the page should be choose well, words
> like "suggested reading" are far better for those who take things
> personally.
>

Good point.

> I will gladly review such a page :-)
>

Great.  Maybe we can start a thread on L10N list about what the
"essential skills" a new volunteer would need in that area?

-Rob

> jan.
>
> On 19 October 2012 18:17, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
>> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
>> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
>> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
>> all volunteers should probably do.
>>
>> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
>> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
>> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
>> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
>> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
>> volunteers to take.
>>
>> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
>> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
>> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
>> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
>> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
>> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
>>
>> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
>> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
>> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>>
>> For example:
>>
>> Level 1 tasks:
>>
>> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the Apache
>> Way
>>
>> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
>> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>>
>> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
>> rules and folders
>>
>> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>>
>> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>>
>> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
>> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>>
>>
>> Level 2 tasks:
>>
>> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>>
>> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>>
>> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>>
>> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
>> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
>> etc.
>>
>> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
>> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
>> now completed Level 2.
>>
>> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
>> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
>> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
>> new test case.
>>
>> Is any one interested in helping with this?
>>
>> -Rob
>>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

jan iversen
I had a funny feeling, that I was the drop that made it flow over :-)

I will make a lists of what I missed and post it on l10n and then we can
take that as a starting point.

jan.


On 19 October 2012 20:04, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:27 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> > That is a BIG +++1 from me.
> >
> > Being a new contributors, I could have saved a lot of "stupid" questions,
> > had I had a reading list.
> >
> > I have spent quite a number of hours (and that of others too) finding
> > things, everybody knows.
> >
> > It would be good to have 1 wiki page with a suggested reading and items
> to
> > do (get a wiki account etc.). That page can then later have specialized
> sub
> > pages depending on the type of volunteer.
> >
>
> Right.  This is the idea.
>
> > What really bothers me, is that I waste time for many others, who are
> very
> > polite in helping me get over the first start....with many new volunteers
> > (assuming I am on average) that is a lot of time, that could have been
> > spent on more fruitful things.
> >
>
> Well, I must admit that your recent contributions, enthusiasm and
> questions have prompted these thoughts.  Please don't be bothered that
> you have questions.  This is getting us in the right direction and
> pointing out where we need to improve.  This is good.  We all need to
> keep a good attitude about this.  And I think so far we're doing this
> well.
>
> > I agree however that the wording of the page should be choose well, words
> > like "suggested reading" are far better for those who take things
> > personally.
> >
>
> Good point.
>
> > I will gladly review such a page :-)
> >
>
> Great.  Maybe we can start a thread on L10N list about what the
> "essential skills" a new volunteer would need in that area?
>
> -Rob
>
> > jan.
> >
> > On 19 October 2012 18:17, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> >> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> >> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> >> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> >> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
> >> all volunteers should probably do.
> >>
> >> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> >> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> >> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> >> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
> >> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> >> volunteers to take.
> >>
> >> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> >> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> >> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> >> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> >> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
> >> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
> >>
> >> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> >> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> >> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
> >>
> >> For example:
> >>
> >> Level 1 tasks:
> >>
> >> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the
> Apache
> >> Way
> >>
> >> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> >> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
> >>
> >> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> >> rules and folders
> >>
> >> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
> >>
> >> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
> >>
> >> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> >> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
> >>
> >>
> >> Level 2 tasks:
> >>
> >> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
> >>
> >> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
> >>
> >> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
> >>
> >> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> >> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
> >> etc.
> >>
> >> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> >> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> >> now completed Level 2.
> >>
> >> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> >> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> >> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
> >> new test case.
> >>
> >> Is any one interested in helping with this?
> >>
> >> -Rob
> >>
>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Rob Weir
In reply to this post by Rob Weir
On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
> all volunteers should probably do.
>
> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> volunteers to take.
>
> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
>
> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>
> For example:
>

To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:

http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html

-Rob

> Level 1 tasks:
>
> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the Apache Way
>
> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>
> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> rules and folders
>
> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>
> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>
> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>
>
> Level 2 tasks:
>
> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>
> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>
> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>
> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
> etc.
>
> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> now completed Level 2.
>
> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
> new test case.
>
> Is any one interested in helping with this?
>
> -Rob
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Kay Schenk-2


On 10/19/2012 01:07 PM, Rob Weir wrote:

> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
>> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
>> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
>> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
>> all volunteers should probably do.
>>
>> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
>> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
>> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
>> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
>> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
>> volunteers to take.
>>
>> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
>> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
>> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
>> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
>> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
>> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
>>
>> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
>> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
>> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>>
>> For example:
>>
>
> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
>
> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
>
> -Rob

This is very good! I esp like the last part about providing a way for
volunteers to "sign up" if you will. This will be a nice touch.

I'm also wondering if there's some way to tie this in to our current
"Help Wanted" page:

https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/OOOUSERS/Help+Wanted

Maybe someone has some ideas?

>
>> Level 1 tasks:
>>
>> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the Apache Way
>>
>> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
>> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>>
>> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
>> rules and folders
>>
>> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>>
>> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>>
>> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
>> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>>
>>
>> Level 2 tasks:
>>
>> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>>
>> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>>
>> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>>
>> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
>> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
>> etc.
>>
>> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
>> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
>> now completed Level 2.
>>
>> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
>> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
>> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
>> new test case.
>>
>> Is any one interested in helping with this?
>>
>> -Rob

--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
MzK

"Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never
  dealt with a cat."
                                -- Robert Heinlein
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Rob Weir-2
On Oct 19, 2012, at 4:45 PM, Kay Schenk <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
> On 10/19/2012 01:07 PM, Rob Weir wrote:
>> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
>>> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
>>> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
>>> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
>>> all volunteers should probably do.
>>>
>>> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
>>> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
>>> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
>>> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
>>> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
>>> volunteers to take.
>>>
>>> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
>>> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
>>> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
>>> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
>>> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
>>> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
>>>
>>> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
>>> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
>>> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>>>
>>> For example:
>>
>> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
>>
>> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
>>
>> -Rob
>
> This is very good! I esp like the last part about providing a way for volunteers to "sign up" if you will. This will be a nice touch.
>
> I'm also wondering if there's some way to tie this in to our current "Help Wanted" page:
>
> https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/OOOUSERS/Help+Wanted

Yes, It is worth looking at the new volunteer view of things, from end to end.

My current thinking is this: as we scale the number of volunteers
we'll soon want a better way to track items like these. Maybe putting
them into BZ would work?  Introduce a new field to record "difficulty"
in BZ and filters to list unassigned easy issues?

>
> Maybe someone has some ideas?
>
>>
>>> Level 1 tasks:
>>>
>>> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the Apache Way
>>>
>>> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
>>> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>>>
>>> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
>>> rules and folders
>>>
>>> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>>>
>>> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>>>
>>> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
>>> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>>>
>>>
>>> Level 2 tasks:
>>>
>>> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>>>
>>> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>>>
>>> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>>>
>>> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
>>> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
>>> etc.
>>>
>>> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
>>> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
>>> now completed Level 2.
>>>
>>> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
>>> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
>>> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
>>> new test case.
>>>
>>> Is any one interested in helping with this?
>>>
>>> -Rob
>
> --
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> MzK
>
> "Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never
> dealt with a cat."
>                               -- Robert Heinlein
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

jan iversen
In reply to this post by Rob Weir
I think it is a good starting point, however I dont like the notation
"level 1", is looks like a graduation process, and I have to ask myself
where am I on that latter.

1) Introduce yourself (by the way I think I have forgotten that).
   why do it on the mailling list, when Wiki ask you for more or less the
exact same type of information.

2) I like that.

3) +1, but I will never understand why it is a mailing list and not a
forum, where it is so much easier to look at history

4+5) yes, but that has not much to do specifically with AOO.

7) the project planning part seems a bit of a contradiction, look at
localization planning as an example.

Sorry for being frank, I do not want to be non-polite, but a lot of these
items just highlight my difficulties.

All aside, I think we are making huge steps in the right direction and that
is what matters !!!!

jan.


On 19 October 2012 22:07, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> > Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> > need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> > to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
> > all volunteers should probably do.
> >
> > Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> > the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> > over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> > information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
> > put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> > volunteers to take.
> >
> > Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> > what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> > them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> > I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> > end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
> > their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
> >
> > One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> > "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> > that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
> >
> > For example:
> >
>
> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
>
> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
>
> -Rob
>
> > Level 1 tasks:
> >
> > 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the
> Apache Way
> >
> > 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> > have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
> >
> > 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> > rules and folders
> >
> > 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
> >
> > 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
> >
> > 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> > and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
> >
> >
> > Level 2 tasks:
> >
> > 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
> >
> > 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
> >
> > 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
> >
> > 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> > development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
> > etc.
> >
> > 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> > Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> > now completed Level 2.
> >
> > Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> > area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> > How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
> > new test case.
> >
> > Is any one interested in helping with this?
> >
> > -Rob
>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

jan iversen
In reply to this post by Rob Weir-2
I think it is important to remember, that a volunteer is not signing up for
anything.

A volunteer, in my view, is a person who wants to help with his/hers
skillset...so if we start saying you have to pass level x before continuing
we have already lost (At least I can relate that to myself)

I have been in this business since 1975, and I have never made it through
any of all these "master classes" and other exams. I am just one of the
guys who get things done, like in the early days before tcp/ip.

What I am trying to say is, let´s help people work with us....that´s what
it´s all about, if we can help people to easier help us, then we have a
win-win situation.

And in respect of introducing myself, which I forgot please read this
resume:
http://wiki.openoffice.org/wiki/User:JanIversen

jan.

Jan.



On 19 October 2012 23:08, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Oct 19, 2012, at 4:45 PM, Kay Schenk <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > On 10/19/2012 01:07 PM, Rob Weir wrote:
> >> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >>> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> >>> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> >>> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> >>> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
> >>> all volunteers should probably do.
> >>>
> >>> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> >>> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> >>> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> >>> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
> >>> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> >>> volunteers to take.
> >>>
> >>> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> >>> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> >>> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> >>> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> >>> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
> >>> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
> >>>
> >>> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> >>> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> >>> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
> >>>
> >>> For example:
> >>
> >> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
> >>
> >> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
> >>
> >> -Rob
> >
> > This is very good! I esp like the last part about providing a way for
> volunteers to "sign up" if you will. This will be a nice touch.
> >
> > I'm also wondering if there's some way to tie this in to our current
> "Help Wanted" page:
> >
> > https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/OOOUSERS/Help+Wanted
>
> Yes, It is worth looking at the new volunteer view of things, from end to
> end.
>
> My current thinking is this: as we scale the number of volunteers
> we'll soon want a better way to track items like these. Maybe putting
> them into BZ would work?  Introduce a new field to record "difficulty"
> in BZ and filters to list unassigned easy issues?
>
> >
> > Maybe someone has some ideas?
> >
> >>
> >>> Level 1 tasks:
> >>>
> >>> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the
> Apache Way
> >>>
> >>> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> >>> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
> >>>
> >>> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> >>> rules and folders
> >>>
> >>> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
> >>>
> >>> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
> >>>
> >>> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> >>> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Level 2 tasks:
> >>>
> >>> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
> >>>
> >>> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
> >>>
> >>> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
> >>>
> >>> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> >>> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
> >>> etc.
> >>>
> >>> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> >>> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> >>> now completed Level 2.
> >>>
> >>> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> >>> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> >>> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
> >>> new test case.
> >>>
> >>> Is any one interested in helping with this?
> >>>
> >>> -Rob
> >
> > --
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > MzK
> >
> > "Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never
> > dealt with a cat."
> >                               -- Robert Heinlein
>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Rob Weir
In reply to this post by jan iversen
On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 5:47 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I think it is a good starting point, however I dont like the notation
> "level 1", is looks like a graduation process, and I have to ask myself
> where am I on that latter.
>

I don't want suggest that everyone must go through these steps.  An
experienced open source volunteer probably would just skim this
material.  Someone who is a Committer on another Apache project would
probably skip over it altogether.

The name "Level 1" doesn't matter.  We can call it "Stage 1", or even
"Introduction".  But there is an explicit ordering, and giving numbers
is the natural way to express an ordering.  But I am sensitive to
having these stages give the feeling of accomplishment without
becoming unwelcome status markers.

> 1) Introduce yourself (by the way I think I have forgotten that).
>    why do it on the mailling list, when Wiki ask you for more or less the
> exact same type of information.
>

This is more for the benefit of existing project volunteers already
subscribed to ooo-dev.  This gives them the opportunity to see who is
getting involved.  They might recognize some names.  If so they can
reach out to offer additional help and encouragement.


> 2) I like that.
>
> 3) +1, but I will never understand why it is a mailing list and not a
> forum, where it is so much easier to look at history
>

Mailing lists are the lowest common denominator technologies.  You can
access email from nearly any device, online or offline, using plain
text.

It is important to note that as a project we don't directly control
mailing lists, websites, Bugzilla, etc., except at the level of the
content and application admin functions.  The sysadmin functions are
done ASF-wide by a group of volunteers that we call the Apache
Infrastructure team.  Since they are maintaining services for over 100
projects, there are limits to how much customization each project can
have.  This is a consideration for maintenance as well as server
resources and security.  So there is a something like a "menu" of
tools we have access to, and which are supported by the Infra team.
But changing the menu is more difficult.

> 4+5) yes, but that has not much to do specifically with AOO.
>

Right.  But these are practical issues that have come up with past
volunteers.   For any such document we need to assume some initial
skill/knowledge level.  This means those who have these skills already
will find some items unnecessary.  This is hard to avoid.


> 7) the project planning part seems a bit of a contradiction, look at
> localization planning as an example.
>

Maybe calling it "Project Coordination" would be more accurate.  CWiki
is what we've been using to coordinate the various efforts of a major
project-wide initiative, like a specific release.   For example, we're
using a page now to coordinate graduation-related infrastructure
changes:  https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/OOOUSERS/Graduation+Infrastructure+Changes

> Sorry for being frank, I do not want to be non-polite, but a lot of these
> items just highlight my difficulties.
>

Nothing on this page is going to help with the current localization
process.  I'm hoping that, with your help, we resolve that in
parallel.

-Rob

> All aside, I think we are making huge steps in the right direction and that
> is what matters !!!!
>
> jan.
>
>
> On 19 October 2012 22:07, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> > I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
>> > Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
>> > need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
>> > to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
>> > all volunteers should probably do.
>> >
>> > Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
>> > the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
>> > over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
>> > information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
>> > put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
>> > volunteers to take.
>> >
>> > Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
>> > what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
>> > them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
>> > I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
>> > end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
>> > their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
>> >
>> > One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
>> > "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
>> > that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>> >
>> > For example:
>> >
>>
>> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
>>
>> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
>>
>> -Rob
>>
>> > Level 1 tasks:
>> >
>> > 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the
>> Apache Way
>> >
>> > 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
>> > have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>> >
>> > 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
>> > rules and folders
>> >
>> > 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>> >
>> > 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>> >
>> > 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
>> > and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>> >
>> >
>> > Level 2 tasks:
>> >
>> > 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>> >
>> > 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>> >
>> > 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>> >
>> > 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
>> > development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
>> > etc.
>> >
>> > 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
>> > Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
>> > now completed Level 2.
>> >
>> > Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
>> > area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
>> > How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
>> > new test case.
>> >
>> > Is any one interested in helping with this?
>> >
>> > -Rob
>>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Rob Weir
In reply to this post by jan iversen
On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 6:16 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I think it is important to remember, that a volunteer is not signing up for
> anything.
>
> A volunteer, in my view, is a person who wants to help with his/hers
> skillset...so if we start saying you have to pass level x before continuing
> we have already lost (At least I can relate that to myself)
>

That might be true for you.  But I can tell you from experience that
we've had volunteer after volunteer who have posted a note to this
list, said they wanted to help, stuck around for a few days, and then
were never heard of again.  They never found a hook that they could
attach themselves to.  They never figured out how to get started.  The
couldn't find where to get started.  The lack of accomplishment and
progress leads to frustration, and then they are gone.

Maybe we can find some way of expressing this without offering too
much offense ?

-Rob

> I have been in this business since 1975, and I have never made it through
> any of all these "master classes" and other exams. I am just one of the
> guys who get things done, like in the early days before tcp/ip.
>
> What I am trying to say is, let´s help people work with us....that´s what
> it´s all about, if we can help people to easier help us, then we have a
> win-win situation.
>
> And in respect of introducing myself, which I forgot please read this
> resume:
> http://wiki.openoffice.org/wiki/User:JanIversen
>
> jan.
>
> Jan.
>
>
>
> On 19 October 2012 23:08, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> On Oct 19, 2012, at 4:45 PM, Kay Schenk <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >
>> > On 10/19/2012 01:07 PM, Rob Weir wrote:
>> >> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> >>> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
>> >>> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
>> >>> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
>> >>> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
>> >>> all volunteers should probably do.
>> >>>
>> >>> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
>> >>> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
>> >>> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
>> >>> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
>> >>> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
>> >>> volunteers to take.
>> >>>
>> >>> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
>> >>> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
>> >>> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
>> >>> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
>> >>> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
>> >>> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
>> >>>
>> >>> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
>> >>> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
>> >>> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>> >>>
>> >>> For example:
>> >>
>> >> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
>> >>
>> >> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
>> >>
>> >> -Rob
>> >
>> > This is very good! I esp like the last part about providing a way for
>> volunteers to "sign up" if you will. This will be a nice touch.
>> >
>> > I'm also wondering if there's some way to tie this in to our current
>> "Help Wanted" page:
>> >
>> > https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/OOOUSERS/Help+Wanted
>>
>> Yes, It is worth looking at the new volunteer view of things, from end to
>> end.
>>
>> My current thinking is this: as we scale the number of volunteers
>> we'll soon want a better way to track items like these. Maybe putting
>> them into BZ would work?  Introduce a new field to record "difficulty"
>> in BZ and filters to list unassigned easy issues?
>>
>> >
>> > Maybe someone has some ideas?
>> >
>> >>
>> >>> Level 1 tasks:
>> >>>
>> >>> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the
>> Apache Way
>> >>>
>> >>> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
>> >>> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>> >>>
>> >>> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
>> >>> rules and folders
>> >>>
>> >>> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>> >>>
>> >>> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>> >>>
>> >>> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
>> >>> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>> Level 2 tasks:
>> >>>
>> >>> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>> >>>
>> >>> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>> >>>
>> >>> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>> >>>
>> >>> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
>> >>> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
>> >>> etc.
>> >>>
>> >>> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
>> >>> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
>> >>> now completed Level 2.
>> >>>
>> >>> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
>> >>> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
>> >>> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
>> >>> new test case.
>> >>>
>> >>> Is any one interested in helping with this?
>> >>>
>> >>> -Rob
>> >
>> > --
>> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> > MzK
>> >
>> > "Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never
>> > dealt with a cat."
>> >                               -- Robert Heinlein
>>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

jan iversen
In reply to this post by Rob Weir
Sorry, I think I was a bit to argumentative last night, I really like your
idea

I have added a few comments below.

jan.


On 20 October 2012 00:18, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 5:47 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> > I think it is a good starting point, however I dont like the notation
> > "level 1", is looks like a graduation process, and I have to ask myself
> > where am I on that latter.
> >
>
> I don't want suggest that everyone must go through these steps.  An
> experienced open source volunteer probably would just skim this
> material.  Someone who is a Committer on another Apache project would
> probably skip over it altogether.
>
> The name "Level 1" doesn't matter.  We can call it "Stage 1", or even
> "Introduction".  But there is an explicit ordering, and giving numbers
> is the natural way to express an ordering.  But I am sensitive to
> having these stages give the feeling of accomplishment without
> becoming unwelcome status markers.
>
Your list is quite OK, may I suggest calling "help to get started", and of
course you are right about the numbering, it was the sense of having to
cross a bridge that caught me.

>
> > 1) Introduce yourself (by the way I think I have forgotten that).
> >    why do it on the mailling list, when Wiki ask you for more or less the
> > exact same type of information.
> >
>
> This is more for the benefit of existing project volunteers already
> subscribed to ooo-dev.  This gives them the opportunity to see who is
> getting involved.  They might recognize some names.  If so they can
> reach out to offer additional help and encouragement.
>
>
> > 2) I like that.
> >
> > 3) +1, but I will never understand why it is a mailing list and not a
> > forum, where it is so much easier to look at history
> >
>
> Mailing lists are the lowest common denominator technologies.  You can
> access email from nearly any device, online or offline, using plain
> text.
>
> It is important to note that as a project we don't directly control
> mailing lists, websites, Bugzilla, etc., except at the level of the
> content and application admin functions.  The sysadmin functions are
> done ASF-wide by a group of volunteers that we call the Apache
> Infrastructure team.  Since they are maintaining services for over 100
> projects, there are limits to how much customization each project can
> have.  This is a consideration for maintenance as well as server
> resources and security.  So there is a something like a "menu" of
> tools we have access to, and which are supported by the Infra team.
> But changing the menu is more difficult.
>
> > 4+5) yes, but that has not much to do specifically with AOO.
> >
>
> Right.  But these are practical issues that have come up with past
> volunteers.   For any such document we need to assume some initial
> skill/knowledge level.  This means those who have these skills already
> will find some items unnecessary.  This is hard to avoid.
>
>
> > 7) the project planning part seems a bit of a contradiction, look at
> > localization planning as an example.
> >
>
> Maybe calling it "Project Coordination" would be more accurate.  CWiki
> is what we've been using to coordinate the various efforts of a major
> project-wide initiative, like a specific release.   For example, we're
> using a page now to coordinate graduation-related infrastructure
> changes:
> https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/OOOUSERS/Graduation+Infrastructure+Changes
>
I think it is wise to have coordination pages, and needed with the number
of people involved.


>
> > Sorry for being frank, I do not want to be non-polite, but a lot of these
> > items just highlight my difficulties.
> >
>
> Nothing on this page is going to help with the current localization
> process.  I'm hoping that, with your help, we resolve that in
> parallel.
>
I know that, I am past most of these items, but they are important for
other volunteers, I assume you saw the list I made on l10n, and got one
very long reply related to localization.

I work quite a lot at the moment to get the proposal finished and the
l10n.openoffice.org updated.



>
> -Rob
>
> > All aside, I think we are making huge steps in the right direction and
> that
> > is what matters !!!!
> >
> > jan.
> >
> >
> > On 19 October 2012 22:07, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> >> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >> > I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> >> > Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> >> > need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> >> > to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
> >> > all volunteers should probably do.
> >> >
> >> > Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> >> > the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> >> > over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> >> > information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
> >> > put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> >> > volunteers to take.
> >> >
> >> > Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> >> > what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> >> > them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> >> > I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> >> > end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
> >> > their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
> >> >
> >> > One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> >> > "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> >> > that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
> >> >
> >> > For example:
> >> >
> >>
> >> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
> >>
> >> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
> >>
> >> -Rob
> >>
> >> > Level 1 tasks:
> >> >
> >> > 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the
> >> Apache Way
> >> >
> >> > 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> >> > have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
> >> >
> >> > 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> >> > rules and folders
> >> >
> >> > 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
> >> >
> >> > 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
> >> >
> >> > 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> >> > and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > Level 2 tasks:
> >> >
> >> > 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
> >> >
> >> > 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
> >> >
> >> > 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
> >> >
> >> > 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> >> > development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
> >> > etc.
> >> >
> >> > 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> >> > Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> >> > now completed Level 2.
> >> >
> >> > Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> >> > area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> >> > How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
> >> > new test case.
> >> >
> >> > Is any one interested in helping with this?
> >> >
> >> > -Rob
> >>
>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

jan iversen
In reply to this post by Rob Weir
You are quite right, I might not be the typical volunteer, and it is very
important to find a hook where you can start, I had the luck that juergen
and andrea gave me a starting point.

Your list is quite ok, just lets call it something neutral, like "help to
get started".

jan

On 20 October 2012 00:24, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 6:16 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> > I think it is important to remember, that a volunteer is not signing up
> for
> > anything.
> >
> > A volunteer, in my view, is a person who wants to help with his/hers
> > skillset...so if we start saying you have to pass level x before
> continuing
> > we have already lost (At least I can relate that to myself)
> >
>
> That might be true for you.  But I can tell you from experience that
> we've had volunteer after volunteer who have posted a note to this
> list, said they wanted to help, stuck around for a few days, and then
> were never heard of again.  They never found a hook that they could
> attach themselves to.  They never figured out how to get started.  The
> couldn't find where to get started.  The lack of accomplishment and
> progress leads to frustration, and then they are gone.
>
> Maybe we can find some way of expressing this without offering too
> much offense ?
>
> -Rob
>
> > I have been in this business since 1975, and I have never made it through
> > any of all these "master classes" and other exams. I am just one of the
> > guys who get things done, like in the early days before tcp/ip.
> >
> > What I am trying to say is, let´s help people work with us....that´s what
> > it´s all about, if we can help people to easier help us, then we have a
> > win-win situation.
> >
> > And in respect of introducing myself, which I forgot please read this
> > resume:
> > http://wiki.openoffice.org/wiki/User:JanIversen
> >
> > jan.
> >
> > Jan.
> >
> >
> >
> > On 19 October 2012 23:08, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> >> On Oct 19, 2012, at 4:45 PM, Kay Schenk <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > On 10/19/2012 01:07 PM, Rob Weir wrote:
> >> >> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> >> >>> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> >> >>> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> >> >>> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> >> >>> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things
> that
> >> >>> all volunteers should probably do.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> >> >>> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> >> >>> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> >> >>> information (or at least links to this information) into one place
> and
> >> >>> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> >> >>> volunteers to take.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> >> >>> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> >> >>> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> >> >>> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> >> >>> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to
> make
> >> >>> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for
> us?
> >> >>>
> >> >>> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> >> >>> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> >> >>> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> For example:
> >> >>
> >> >> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
> >> >>
> >> >> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
> >> >>
> >> >> -Rob
> >> >
> >> > This is very good! I esp like the last part about providing a way for
> >> volunteers to "sign up" if you will. This will be a nice touch.
> >> >
> >> > I'm also wondering if there's some way to tie this in to our current
> >> "Help Wanted" page:
> >> >
> >> > https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/OOOUSERS/Help+Wanted
> >>
> >> Yes, It is worth looking at the new volunteer view of things, from end
> to
> >> end.
> >>
> >> My current thinking is this: as we scale the number of volunteers
> >> we'll soon want a better way to track items like these. Maybe putting
> >> them into BZ would work?  Introduce a new field to record "difficulty"
> >> in BZ and filters to list unassigned easy issues?
> >>
> >> >
> >> > Maybe someone has some ideas?
> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >>> Level 1 tasks:
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the
> >> Apache Way
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> >> >>> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> >> >>> rules and folders
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> >> >>> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
> >> >>>
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Level 2 tasks:
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> >> >>> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support,
> localization,
> >> >>> etc.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> >> >>> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> >> >>> now completed Level 2.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> >> >>> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> >> >>> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define
> a
> >> >>> new test case.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Is any one interested in helping with this?
> >> >>>
> >> >>> -Rob
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> >
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >> > MzK
> >> >
> >> > "Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never
> >> > dealt with a cat."
> >> >                               -- Robert Heinlein
> >>
>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Sylvain DENIS
In reply to this post by Rob Weir
Le 19/10/12 18:17, Rob Weir a écrit :

> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
> all volunteers should probably do.
>
> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> volunteers to take.
>
> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
>
> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>
> For example:
>
> Level 1 tasks:
>
> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the Apache Way
>
> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>
> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> rules and folders
>
> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>
> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>
> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>
>
> Level 2 tasks:
>
> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>
> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>
> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>
> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
> etc.
>
> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> now completed Level 2.
>
> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
> new test case.
>
> Is any one interested in helping with this?
>
> -Rob
hello,

I think it is a good idea to have steps

Sylvain DENIS
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RE: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Manuel del Valle
In reply to this post by Rob Weir


> Date: Fri, 19 Oct 2012 18:24:44 -0400
> Subject: Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks
> From: [hidden email]
> To: [hidden email]
>
> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 6:16 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > I think it is important to remember, that a volunteer is not signing up for
> > anything.
> >
> > A volunteer, in my view, is a person who wants to help with his/hers
> > skillset...so if we start saying you have to pass level x before continuing
> > we have already lost (At least I can relate that to myself)
> >
>
> That might be true for you.  But I can tell you from experience that
> we've had volunteer after volunteer who have posted a note to this
> list, said they wanted to help, stuck around for a few days, and then
> were never heard of again.  They never found a hook that they could
> attach themselves to.  They never figured out how to get started.  The
> couldn't find where to get started.  The lack of accomplishment and
> progress leads to frustration, and then they are gone.
>


Hi Rob

My name is Manuel, from Argentina. I've just subscribed (about 10 days ago) to this mailing list, willing to learn and try to contribute on the UX effort. I'm not a developer (as in software dev) and I've never contributed to open source software before. A total newbie ;-)

So, I've been told to read the Project wiki to identify open tasks. I've been trying to keep up with this mailing list, and understand the info published in Cwiki, or Mwiki. I have to admit I've been having a hard time doing so, because the amount of information is quite overwhelming for a newbie like me. And if I want to start "doing something", I really don't know were to.
I could have continued asking for help, but I realized that it was a better idea to go on reading about the project, and try to understand how you people get organized, and what's expected of me (and others like me).

I'm not thinking about giving up (just yet ;-) but I think it would be a great idea to write some kind of a "newbies' tutorial", like the one you're proposing. Just gathering all the already existing info, and encouraging volunteers to do this or that for themselves. And we should find it when clicking on the "I want to participate in OpenOffice" link, on the landing page in openoffice.org. It would be most useful for us.

+1 on the "staging accomplishment" you propose. Personally, I like it. It gives the sense of progress. And it would be great if specific areas within the project could use this model on their sub-projects as well (development first steps, marketing first steps, etc).

-Manuel


> Maybe we can find some way of expressing this without offering too
> much offense ?
>
> -Rob
>
> > I have been in this business since 1975, and I have never made it through
> > any of all these "master classes" and other exams. I am just one of the
> > guys who get things done, like in the early days before tcp/ip.
> >
> > What I am trying to say is, let´s help people work with us....that´s what
> > it´s all about, if we can help people to easier help us, then we have a
> > win-win situation.
> >
> > And in respect of introducing myself, which I forgot please read this
> > resume:
> > http://wiki.openoffice.org/wiki/User:JanIversen
> >
> > jan.
> >
> > Jan.
> >
> >
> >
> > On 19 October 2012 23:08, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> >> On Oct 19, 2012, at 4:45 PM, Kay Schenk <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > On 10/19/2012 01:07 PM, Rob Weir wrote:
> >> >> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >> >>> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> >> >>> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> >> >>> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> >> >>> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
> >> >>> all volunteers should probably do.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> >> >>> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> >> >>> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> >> >>> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
> >> >>> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> >> >>> volunteers to take.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> >> >>> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> >> >>> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> >> >>> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> >> >>> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
> >> >>> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
> >> >>>
> >> >>> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> >> >>> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> >> >>> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> For example:
> >> >>
> >> >> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
> >> >>
> >> >> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
> >> >>
> >> >> -Rob
> >> >
> >> > This is very good! I esp like the last part about providing a way for
> >> volunteers to "sign up" if you will. This will be a nice touch.
> >> >
> >> > I'm also wondering if there's some way to tie this in to our current
> >> "Help Wanted" page:
> >> >
> >> > https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/OOOUSERS/Help+Wanted
> >>
> >> Yes, It is worth looking at the new volunteer view of things, from end to
> >> end.
> >>
> >> My current thinking is this: as we scale the number of volunteers
> >> we'll soon want a better way to track items like these. Maybe putting
> >> them into BZ would work?  Introduce a new field to record "difficulty"
> >> in BZ and filters to list unassigned easy issues?
> >>
> >> >
> >> > Maybe someone has some ideas?
> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >>> Level 1 tasks:
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the
> >> Apache Way
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> >> >>> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> >> >>> rules and folders
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> >> >>> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
> >> >>>
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Level 2 tasks:
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> >> >>> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
> >> >>> etc.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> >> >>> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> >> >>> now completed Level 2.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> >> >>> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> >> >>> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
> >> >>> new test case.
> >> >>>
> >> >>> Is any one interested in helping with this?
> >> >>>
> >> >>> -Rob
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >> > MzK
> >> >
> >> > "Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never
> >> > dealt with a cat."
> >> >                               -- Robert Heinlein
> >>
     
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Alexandro Colorado-4
In reply to this post by Rob Weir
On 10/19/12, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things that
> all volunteers should probably do.

Well this is why OOo was structure the way it was. Is a bit funny when
Apache people came and wanted to make us be more equals, no ECC, no
NLC, no MarCon, Project Lead, Co-leads, no distinction between
developers and normal randome dude at the support ML.

Now trying to find who will do what, is becoming HUGE 'managing'
nightmare. I a not saying that OOo structure was the best one to
handle things but having so many projects and so many tasks did demand
some kind of categorization.

> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
> information (or at least links to this information) into one place and
> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
> volunteers to take.

The thing is we kinda already had that. At least to an extend, again
it wasnt the perfect 'all-you-need-to-know bibile'. But we had
'contributing' which was a pseudo-project to collect 'getting started
guides' for the different vains the project was going. This will
direct new users to art, marketing, support, native-lang, programming
or qa/testing.

https://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/incubator/ooo/ooo-site/trunk/content/contributing/

> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to make
> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for us?
>
> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>
> For example:
>
> Level 1 tasks:
>
> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the Apache
> Way
>
> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>
> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
> rules and folders
>
> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>
> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>
> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>
>
> Level 2 tasks:
>
> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>
> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>
> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>
> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support, localization,
> etc.
>
> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
> now completed Level 2.
>
> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define a
> new test case.
>
> Is any one interested in helping with this?
>
> -Rob
>


--
Alexandro Colorado
PPMC Apache OpenOffice
http://es.openoffice.org
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Fernando Cassia
In reply to this post by jan iversen
On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 6:47 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]> wrote:
> 3) +1, but I will never understand why it is a mailing list and not a
> forum, where it is so much easier to look at history

Oh please, not again... mailing lists have many advantages over web forums:

1. Speed (the emails arrive automagically, are text-only -most of the
time-), no waiting for forum web pages to load, no adverts, no
footers, no colors, no graphical sig files, no animated gifs to look
at, no delay to "log-in", messages just arrive to your mailbox
2. Easy archival (just set a rule and archive your list email to a
given subfolder or a given GMail Label)
3. Reply speed (most of my on-line time is spent loking at the gmail
inbox, when something of interest arrives -ie ooo-dev with some
interesting subject line- I click and read it immediately).
4. Sense of community: it´s much easier to deal with troublemakers,
spammers and trolls etc on a mailing list (just ban his email address)
than on web forums.

...and that just are the most obvious ones off the top of my head on a
Sunday at 4:50am local time...

FC
--
During times of Universal Deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act
- George Orwell
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

jan iversen
Sorry, it seemed my remark sparked quite some feelings, that was not my
intention !

But not having been on the list for very long, means that there a lot of
history I dont have, and the mailer didnt exactly like when I tried to get
all messages. During my research for a updated l10n process, I have often
heard "that has been discussed before", which makes me go search for old
mail. In a forum we would have more catagories than just one mailling list,
making it easier to find relevant old information. That was all that was in
my remark (getting history).

Jan.

On 21 October 2012 09:50, Fernando Cassia <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 6:47 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> > 3) +1, but I will never understand why it is a mailing list and not a
> > forum, where it is so much easier to look at history
>
> Oh please, not again... mailing lists have many advantages over web forums:
>
> 1. Speed (the emails arrive automagically, are text-only -most of the
> time-), no waiting for forum web pages to load, no adverts, no
> footers, no colors, no graphical sig files, no animated gifs to look
> at, no delay to "log-in", messages just arrive to your mailbox
> 2. Easy archival (just set a rule and archive your list email to a
> given subfolder or a given GMail Label)
> 3. Reply speed (most of my on-line time is spent loking at the gmail
> inbox, when something of interest arrives -ie ooo-dev with some
> interesting subject line- I click and read it immediately).
> 4. Sense of community: it´s much easier to deal with troublemakers,
> spammers and trolls etc on a mailing list (just ban his email address)
> than on web forums.
>
> ...and that just are the most obvious ones off the top of my head on a
> Sunday at 4:50am local time...
>
> FC
> --
> During times of Universal Deceit, telling the truth becomes a
> revolutionary act
> - George Orwell
>
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Alexandro Colorado-4
On Sun, Oct 21, 2012 at 4:17 AM, jan iversen <[hidden email]>wrote:

> Sorry, it seemed my remark sparked quite some feelings, that was not my
> intention !
>
> But not having been on the list for very long, means that there a lot of
> history I dont have, and the mailer didnt exactly like when I tried to get
> all messages. During my research for a updated l10n process, I have often
> heard "that has been discussed before", which makes me go search for old
> mail. In a forum we would have more catagories than just one mailling list,
> making it easier to find relevant old information. That was all that was in
> my remark (getting history).
>

There is a point to that, usually mailing list are backed up on other
services like gmame and nabbel, this are more web-friendly ui to find
relevant email from the past. That is usually what I do to find
conversations. I still dont have much experience with Markmail to be able
to do quick searches, plus I think this is only there for the old ML.


>
> Jan.
>
> On 21 October 2012 09:50, Fernando Cassia <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 6:47 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]>
> > wrote:
> > > 3) +1, but I will never understand why it is a mailing list and not a
> > > forum, where it is so much easier to look at history
> >
> > Oh please, not again... mailing lists have many advantages over web
> forums:
> >
> > 1. Speed (the emails arrive automagically, are text-only -most of the
> > time-), no waiting for forum web pages to load, no adverts, no
> > footers, no colors, no graphical sig files, no animated gifs to look
> > at, no delay to "log-in", messages just arrive to your mailbox
> > 2. Easy archival (just set a rule and archive your list email to a
> > given subfolder or a given GMail Label)
> > 3. Reply speed (most of my on-line time is spent loking at the gmail
> > inbox, when something of interest arrives -ie ooo-dev with some
> > interesting subject line- I click and read it immediately).
> > 4. Sense of community: it´s much easier to deal with troublemakers,
> > spammers and trolls etc on a mailing list (just ban his email address)
> > than on web forums.
> >
> > ...and that just are the most obvious ones off the top of my head on a
> > Sunday at 4:50am local time...
> >
> > FC
> > --
> > During times of Universal Deceit, telling the truth becomes a
> > revolutionary act
> > - George Orwell
> >
>



--
Alexandro Colorado
PPMC Apache OpenOffice
http://es.openoffice.org
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Re: AOO volunteers: essential skills and tasks

Jürgen Schmidt-3
In reply to this post by jan iversen
On 10/20/12 10:06 AM, jan iversen wrote:
> You are quite right, I might not be the typical volunteer, and it is very
> important to find a hook where you can start, I had the luck that juergen
> and andrea gave me a starting point.
>
> Your list is quite ok, just lets call it something neutral, like "help to
> get started".

I think part of the problem is that we have sometimes too much
information for the same things and it is not well structured. For
example the building guides, we have several pages describing how to
build AOO. Some of these pages are old and out-dated or incomplete. And
we have the new guide which is not the first hit when you search for it
(at least I find always the old ones first). I think cleanup of the
available info would be also of great help.

And we should make clear that asking questions is ok and wanted, it
gives not really stupid questions. We can try to use any question to
improve things, we can ask ourselves why was this question asked and why
wasn't the potentially available information not found...

Juergen


>
> jan
>
> On 20 October 2012 00:24, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 6:16 PM, jan iversen <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>> I think it is important to remember, that a volunteer is not signing up
>> for
>>> anything.
>>>
>>> A volunteer, in my view, is a person who wants to help with his/hers
>>> skillset...so if we start saying you have to pass level x before
>> continuing
>>> we have already lost (At least I can relate that to myself)
>>>
>>
>> That might be true for you.  But I can tell you from experience that
>> we've had volunteer after volunteer who have posted a note to this
>> list, said they wanted to help, stuck around for a few days, and then
>> were never heard of again.  They never found a hook that they could
>> attach themselves to.  They never figured out how to get started.  The
>> couldn't find where to get started.  The lack of accomplishment and
>> progress leads to frustration, and then they are gone.
>>
>> Maybe we can find some way of expressing this without offering too
>> much offense ?
>>
>> -Rob
>>
>>> I have been in this business since 1975, and I have never made it through
>>> any of all these "master classes" and other exams. I am just one of the
>>> guys who get things done, like in the early days before tcp/ip.
>>>
>>> What I am trying to say is, let´s help people work with us....that´s what
>>> it´s all about, if we can help people to easier help us, then we have a
>>> win-win situation.
>>>
>>> And in respect of introducing myself, which I forgot please read this
>>> resume:
>>> http://wiki.openoffice.org/wiki/User:JanIversen
>>>
>>> jan.
>>>
>>> Jan.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On 19 October 2012 23:08, Rob Weir <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Oct 19, 2012, at 4:45 PM, Kay Schenk <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On 10/19/2012 01:07 PM, Rob Weir wrote:
>>>>>> On Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 12:17 PM, Rob Weir <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>>>>> I am thinking about what new project volunteers need to get started.
>>>>>>> Obviously there are area-specific things.  For example, developers
>>>>>>> need to know how to download and build.  Translation volunteers need
>>>>>>> to understand Pootle, etc.  But there are also some basic things
>> that
>>>>>>> all volunteers should probably do.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Although we have all of this information (or at least most of it) on
>>>>>>> the website or wikis or mailing list archives, it is scattered all
>>>>>>> over the place.  I think it would be good if we could collect this
>>>>>>> information (or at least links to this information) into one place
>> and
>>>>>>> put a linear order behind it, a step of specific steps we want new
>>>>>>> volunteers to take.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Now, I can hear the objections already -- you can't tell volunteers
>>>>>>> what to do.  That is why they are volunteers.  You can't regiment
>>>>>>> them, etc.  This is true.  But at the scale we need to operate at --
>>>>>>> I'm aiming to attract dozens of new volunteers on the project by the
>>>>>>> end of the year -- we need some structure.  So what can we do to
>> make
>>>>>>> their first 2 weeks in the project easier for them, and easier for
>> us?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> One idea:  Think of the new volunteer startup tasks in terms of
>>>>>>> "stages" or "levels", a defined set of reading and other activities
>>>>>>> that leads them to acquire basic skills in our community.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> For example:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> To make it more concrete, this is what "Level 1" might look like:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> http://incubator.apache.org/openofficeorg/orientation/level-1.html
>>>>>>
>>>>>> -Rob
>>>>>
>>>>> This is very good! I esp like the last part about providing a way for
>>>> volunteers to "sign up" if you will. This will be a nice touch.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm also wondering if there's some way to tie this in to our current
>>>> "Help Wanted" page:
>>>>>
>>>>> https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/OOOUSERS/Help+Wanted
>>>>
>>>> Yes, It is worth looking at the new volunteer view of things, from end
>> to
>>>> end.
>>>>
>>>> My current thinking is this: as we scale the number of volunteers
>>>> we'll soon want a better way to track items like these. Maybe putting
>>>> them into BZ would work?  Introduce a new field to record "difficulty"
>>>> in BZ and filters to list unassigned easy issues?
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Maybe someone has some ideas?
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Level 1 tasks:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 1) Read the following web pages on the ASF, roles at Apache and the
>>>> Apache Way
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 2) Sign up for the following accounts that every volunteer should
>>>>>>> have:  ooo-announce, ooo-dev, ooo-users,  MWiki, CWiki, BZ, Forums
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 3) Read this helpful document on hints for managing your inbox with
>>>>>>> rules and folders
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 4) Read this code of conduct page on list etiquette
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 5) Send a note to ooo-dev list and introduce yourself
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 6) Edit this wiki page  containing project volunteers. Add your name
>>>>>>> and indicate that you have completed Level 1.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Level 2 tasks:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 1) Using the Apache CMS in anonymous mode
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 2) Readings on decision making at Apache
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 3) Readings on project life cycle and roles within the AOO project
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 4) Introduction to the various functional groups within the project:
>>>>>>> development, qa, marketing, UX, documentation, support,
>> localization,
>>>>>>> etc.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> 5) Pick one or more functional groups that you want to help with.
>>>>>>> Edit the volunteer wiki and list them.  Also indicate that you have
>>>>>>> now completed Level 2.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Get the idea?  After Level 2 this then could branch off into
>>>>>>> area-specific lists of start up tasks:  how to download and build.
>>>>>>> How to submit patches.  How to update a translation.  How to define
>> a
>>>>>>> new test case.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Is any one interested in helping with this?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> -Rob
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>>> MzK
>>>>>
>>>>> "Anyone who considers protocol unimportant has never
>>>>> dealt with a cat."
>>>>>                               -- Robert Heinlein
>>>>
>>
>

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