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New computer

Patricia Shanahan
Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?

I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning a
clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to install
and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install whatever I need
for AOO building.

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Re: New computer

Matthias Seidel
Hi Patricia,

Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
>
Basically yes. ;-)
>
> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning a
> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install whatever
> I need for AOO building.
One thing: For trunk/AOO42X we now need NASM to build OpenSSL.
If you need something, just drop me a line. I can put everything in my
DropBox.

Regards,

   Matthias

(Time for bed now after a really exciting ApacheCon in Berlin)

>
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Re: New computer

Matthias Seidel
In reply to this post by Patricia Shanahan
Hi Patricia,

If you want to build 4.1.x have a look at:
https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-418-Test/ReadMe.txt

For 4.2.x (and trunk) see:
https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-420-Test/ReadMe.txt

This is how I do my test builds.

Regards,

   Matthias

Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:

> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
>
> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning a
> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install whatever
> I need for AOO building.
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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>
>


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Re: New computer

Patricia Shanahan
Any opinions on which I should do?


On 10/25/2019 1:27 PM, Matthias Seidel wrote:

> Hi Patricia,
>
> If you want to build 4.1.x have a look at:
> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-418-Test/ReadMe.txt
>
> For 4.2.x (and trunk) see:
> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-420-Test/ReadMe.txt
>
> This is how I do my test builds.
>
> Regards,
>
>     Matthias
>
> Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
>> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
>>
>> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning a
>> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
>> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install whatever
>> I need for AOO building.
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>
>>
>

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Re: New computer

Rory O'Farrell
On Fri, 25 Oct 2019 21:24:01 -0700
Patricia Shanahan <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Any opinions on which I should do?

I think concentration should be on 4.2.0, working towards a Windows 64 version;

Feedback from posters on the en-Forum indicates an increasing ignorance of computer skills on the part of many new users and their inability to cope with the difference between 32 and 64 bit versions.  It would give AOO a better public profile if a new release of A00 provided a 64 bit Windows version.  

The Ubuntu linux distro seriously considered abandoning 32 bit support entirely; they changed their mind recently, but the writing is on the wall for 32 bit computers.  AOO should move with the times and fill their Windows 64 bit gap.

I use a 64 bit version on Xubuntu 18.04.3 so this does not impact on me.

Rory


>
>
> On 10/25/2019 1:27 PM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
> > Hi Patricia,
> >
> > If you want to build 4.1.x have a look at:
> > https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-418-Test/ReadMe.txt
> >
> > For 4.2.x (and trunk) see:
> > https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-420-Test/ReadMe.txt
> >
> > This is how I do my test builds.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> >     Matthias
> >
> > Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
> >> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
> >>
> >> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning a
> >> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
> >> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install whatever
> >> I need for AOO building.
> >>
> >> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> >> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
> >> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
> >>
> >>
> >
>
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Re: New computer

Pedro Lino-3

> On October 26, 2019 at 8:51 AM Rory O'Farrell <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
> On Fri, 25 Oct 2019 21:24:01 -0700
> Patricia Shanahan <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > Any opinions on which I should do?
>
> I think concentration should be on 4.2.0, working towards a Windows 64 version;

+1
 
> Feedback from posters on the en-Forum indicates an increasing ignorance of computer skills on the part of many new users and their inability to cope with the difference between 32 and 64 bit versions.  It would give AOO a better public profile if a new release of A00 provided a 64 bit Windows version.  

Going 64bit is essential for AOO not because people need 64bit processing but because 32bit PCs haven't been produced for years and OS makers (especially proprietary) are abandoning support for 32bit software (they do need to sell new stuff, don't they?)
Secondly because users have no idea what 32bit or 64bit is and if someone mentions x86 and x64 it is even worse (I have had several people asking me "I should get the x86 because it is a higher number, right?")

Just my 2 cents...

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Re: New computer

Matthias Seidel
In reply to this post by Patricia Shanahan
Hi Patricia,

Am 26.10.19 um 06:24 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
> Any opinions on which I should do?

Of course development for trunk/AOO42X is more important, but we also
need persons that are able to build a 4.1.x release (beware of the "bus
factor" [1]).

At the moment you can do both versions, just like I do. That might
change when we move to a new MSVC for trunk.

Regards,

   Matthias

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus_factor

>
>
> On 10/25/2019 1:27 PM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
>> Hi Patricia,
>>
>> If you want to build 4.1.x have a look at:
>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-418-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>
>> For 4.2.x (and trunk) see:
>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-420-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>
>> This is how I do my test builds.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>>     Matthias
>>
>> Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
>>> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
>>>
>>> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning a
>>> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
>>> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install whatever
>>> I need for AOO building.
>>>
>>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>
>>>
>>
>
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Re: New computer

Matthias Seidel
In reply to this post by Patricia Shanahan
Hi Patricia,

How are things going?
If you are in need of something just let me know...

Regards,

   Matthias

Am 26.10.19 um 06:24 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:

> Any opinions on which I should do?
>
>
> On 10/25/2019 1:27 PM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
>> Hi Patricia,
>>
>> If you want to build 4.1.x have a look at:
>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-418-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>
>> For 4.2.x (and trunk) see:
>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-420-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>
>> This is how I do my test builds.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>>     Matthias
>>
>> Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
>>> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
>>>
>>> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning a
>>> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
>>> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install whatever
>>> I need for AOO building.
>>>
>>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>
>>>
>>
>
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Re: New computer

Patricia Shanahan
Thanks, but what I need is a magic wand of cable untangling I don't
suppose you have one handy.

In installing my new computer I found that the cables connecting various
computers, displays, router, and printer are a mess.

On 10/28/2019 9:51 AM, Matthias Seidel wrote:

> Hi Patricia,
>
> How are things going?
> If you are in need of something just let me know...
>
> Regards,
>
>     Matthias
>
> Am 26.10.19 um 06:24 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
>> Any opinions on which I should do?
>>
>>
>> On 10/25/2019 1:27 PM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
>>> Hi Patricia,
>>>
>>> If you want to build 4.1.x have a look at:
>>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-418-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>>
>>> For 4.2.x (and trunk) see:
>>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-420-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>>
>>> This is how I do my test builds.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>>
>>>      Matthias
>>>
>>> Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
>>>> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
>>>>
>>>> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning a
>>>> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
>>>> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install whatever
>>>> I need for AOO building.
>>>>
>>>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>
>>
>

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Re: New computer

Patricia Shanahan
I detangled the cables the hard way - shut everything down, unplugged,
detangled, and put it back together with only the cables that are
currently being used.

Now I do need some advice. What is the best starting point for learning
Git-for-AOO? I do have a GitHub account, with my personal e-mail address
not my apache.org address.

On 10/28/2019 11:33 AM, Patricia Shanahan wrote:

> Thanks, but what I need is a magic wand of cable untangling I don't
> suppose you have one handy.
>
> In installing my new computer I found that the cables connecting various
> computers, displays, router, and printer are a mess.
>
> On 10/28/2019 9:51 AM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
>> Hi Patricia,
>>
>> How are things going?
>> If you are in need of something just let me know...
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>>     Matthias
>>
>> Am 26.10.19 um 06:24 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
>>> Any opinions on which I should do?
>>>
>>>
>>> On 10/25/2019 1:27 PM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
>>>> Hi Patricia,
>>>>
>>>> If you want to build 4.1.x have a look at:
>>>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-418-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>>>
>>>> For 4.2.x (and trunk) see:
>>>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-420-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>>>
>>>> This is how I do my test builds.
>>>>
>>>> Regards,
>>>>
>>>>      Matthias
>>>>
>>>> Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
>>>>> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
>>>>>
>>>>> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning a
>>>>> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
>>>>> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install whatever
>>>>> I need for AOO building.
>>>>>
>>>>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>
>>>
>>
>

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Re: New computer

Damjan Jovanovic
What do you already know? SVN?

I personally did:
git clone https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/openoffice.git
(ie. not GitHub)
which I think used my Apache credentials. If you prefer to clone from
GitHub, and want to link your Apache and GitHub credentials, you can
apparently do it on:
https://gitbox.apache.org/

As for how you use Git, if you are interested, I can give you some links,
and my own "Git for SVN users" crash course.


On Wed, Oct 30, 2019 at 2:00 PM Patricia Shanahan <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I detangled the cables the hard way - shut everything down, unplugged,
> detangled, and put it back together with only the cables that are
> currently being used.
>
> Now I do need some advice. What is the best starting point for learning
> Git-for-AOO? I do have a GitHub account, with my personal e-mail address
> not my apache.org address.
>
> On 10/28/2019 11:33 AM, Patricia Shanahan wrote:
> > Thanks, but what I need is a magic wand of cable untangling I don't
> > suppose you have one handy.
> >
> > In installing my new computer I found that the cables connecting various
> > computers, displays, router, and printer are a mess.
> >
> > On 10/28/2019 9:51 AM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
> >> Hi Patricia,
> >>
> >> How are things going?
> >> If you are in need of something just let me know...
> >>
> >> Regards,
> >>
> >>     Matthias
> >>
> >> Am 26.10.19 um 06:24 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
> >>> Any opinions on which I should do?
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On 10/25/2019 1:27 PM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
> >>>> Hi Patricia,
> >>>>
> >>>> If you want to build 4.1.x have a look at:
> >>>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-418-Test/ReadMe.txt
> >>>>
> >>>> For 4.2.x (and trunk) see:
> >>>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-420-Test/ReadMe.txt
> >>>>
> >>>> This is how I do my test builds.
> >>>>
> >>>> Regards,
> >>>>
> >>>>      Matthias
> >>>>
> >>>> Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
> >>>>> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
> >>>>>
> >>>>> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning
> a
> >>>>> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
> >>>>> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install
> whatever
> >>>>> I need for AOO building.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
> >>>>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
> >>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
>
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Re: New computer

Patricia Shanahan
On 10/30/2019 8:13 AM, Damjan Jovanovic wrote:
> What do you already know? SVN?

RCS, SCCS, and SVN.

>
> I personally did:
> git clone https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/openoffice.git
> (ie. not GitHub)
> which I think used my Apache credentials. If you prefer to clone from
> GitHub, and want to link your Apache and GitHub credentials, you can
> apparently do it on:
> https://gitbox.apache.org/

Any guidance on how to decide which I am likely to prefer?

>
> As for how you use Git, if you are interested, I can give you some links,
> and my own "Git for SVN users" crash course.

Links would be useful. For me when learning programming languages, "for
dummies" courses work better than conversion courses. The "for dummies"
type of course helps me get into the right mindset for the language. I
don't know whether SVN to Git will be different.

>
>
> On Wed, Oct 30, 2019 at 2:00 PM Patricia Shanahan <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> I detangled the cables the hard way - shut everything down, unplugged,
>> detangled, and put it back together with only the cables that are
>> currently being used.
>>
>> Now I do need some advice. What is the best starting point for learning
>> Git-for-AOO? I do have a GitHub account, with my personal e-mail address
>> not my apache.org address.
>>
>> On 10/28/2019 11:33 AM, Patricia Shanahan wrote:
>>> Thanks, but what I need is a magic wand of cable untangling I don't
>>> suppose you have one handy.
>>>
>>> In installing my new computer I found that the cables connecting various
>>> computers, displays, router, and printer are a mess.
>>>
>>> On 10/28/2019 9:51 AM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
>>>> Hi Patricia,
>>>>
>>>> How are things going?
>>>> If you are in need of something just let me know...
>>>>
>>>> Regards,
>>>>
>>>>      Matthias
>>>>
>>>> Am 26.10.19 um 06:24 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
>>>>> Any opinions on which I should do?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On 10/25/2019 1:27 PM, Matthias Seidel wrote:
>>>>>> Hi Patricia,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> If you want to build 4.1.x have a look at:
>>>>>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-418-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>>>>>
>>>>>> For 4.2.x (and trunk) see:
>>>>>> https://home.apache.org/~mseidel/AOO-builds/AOO-420-Test/ReadMe.txt
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This is how I do my test builds.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Regards,
>>>>>>
>>>>>>       Matthias
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Am 24.10.19 um 22:09 schrieb Patricia Shanahan:
>>>>>>> Are the Windows 10 instructions up-to-date?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I have just got a shiny new Windows 10 Pro computer, and am planning
>> a
>>>>>>> clean start on AOO building. It will take a day or so for me to
>>>>>>> install and set up basic stuff, and then I'll need to install
>> whatever
>>>>>>> I need for AOO building.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>>>>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>>> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>>> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>
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Re: New computer

Damjan Jovanovic
On Wed, Oct 30, 2019 at 6:16 PM Patricia Shanahan <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 10/30/2019 8:13 AM, Damjan Jovanovic wrote:
> > What do you already know? SVN?
>
> RCS, SCCS, and SVN.
>
> >
> > I personally did:
> > git clone https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/openoffice.git
> > (ie. not GitHub)
> > which I think used my Apache credentials. If you prefer to clone from
> > GitHub, and want to link your Apache and GitHub credentials, you can
> > apparently do it on:
> > https://gitbox.apache.org/
>
> Any guidance on how to decide which I am likely to prefer?
>
>
It doesn't really matter which you start with, because they're each other's
mirrors, and in Git you can always change your local repository's "remote".
For example if you cloned GitHub, and want to switch to GitBox, you don't
need to clone the GitBox link, you can simply do:
git remote set-url origin https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/openoffice.git

With GitHub, you can accept GitHub pull requests from other contributors,
even in your web browser, so it might be a better choice in that regard. I
can't say I personally approve of the GitHub lock-in for that feature
though.


> >
> > As for how you use Git, if you are interested, I can give you some links,
> > and my own "Git for SVN users" crash course.
>
> Links would be useful. For me when learning programming languages, "for
> dummies" courses work better than conversion courses. The "for dummies"
> type of course helps me get into the right mindset for the language. I
> don't know whether SVN to Git will be different.
>
>
Ok sure:

Graph theory explanations of how branches and Git operations work:
https://eagain.net/articles/git-for-computer-scientists/

The free online book, "Pro Git":
https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2

A detailed guide to various Git options, written for the Wine project but
generally useful:
https://wiki.winehq.org/Git_Wine_Tutorial

I'll try sum it up for you. For SVN users, Git's terminology is straight
from hell. "svn checkout X" checks out a working copy from repository X,
but "git checkout X" switches the current branch to X (among other things).
Git's equivalent is "git clone" (except that the entire repository with
full history and all branches is cloned, not just a working copy.) An SVN
revision is a commit in Git.

Everything you commit is only committed locally, and can be undone. You
have to "git push" to send your commits upstream.

The main branch of a project is usually called "master", but in AOO ours is
called "trunk" since we imported from SVN. The branch you are on at the
moment is given by "git branch", which lists all the local branches and
stars the current one. "git status" also shows your current branch and
files changed.

Remote branches can be shown with "git remote show origin". If you "git
checkout" with their name, eg. "git checkout AOO418", it will make a local
branch by that name and switch to it. You can also make a local branch
remote (somehow).

You make new local branches with "git branch <name>", eg. "git branch
temp". (It's instantaneous: it doesn't have to copy history or anything
like that). You can "git checkout temp" to switch to it, "git branch -D
temp" to delete it. A "detached head" is when you "git checkout" something
that's not a branch (as you can "git checkout" any commit or tag, not just
a branch). If you are just looking around, that's not a problem, but if you
"git commit" on a detached head, that commit isn't referenced from
anywhere, and if you checkout anything else, you will lose that work. If
you don't want to lose it, you can "git branch myWork" to attach a branch
to that new commit, so you can get back to it later (with "git checkout
myWork").

There are 2 important ways of working with branches, merging and rebasing.
Both are only local, until you "git push". Merging in Git is similar to
merging in SVN, changes in one branch get merged into another, but rebasing
is amazing. With rebasing you can rearrange commits and branches to your
liking, split commits, merge commits, reorder commits, delete commits,
change commit messages, reposition an old branch so it starts at a newer
commit (and deal with outdated code locally in that branch before merging
or pushing it), etc. "git rebase -i HEAD~3" opens a text editor with the
last 3 commits, one per line, describing changes you can make by placing a
keyword at the beginning of its line. If you commit by mistake, do that and
you can drop the bad commit. Of course with great power comes great
responsibility, and rebasing should only really be done locally before you
push, as rebasing commits that were already pushed can mess up other
people's changes to them.

When changes are made upstream by other contributors, you can "git pull"
them, but I prefer the more incremental "git fetch" which fetches changes
without merging them, and then a rebase of my work to come after the latest
changes - that way I know those changes still apply, even if I don't push
them yet. ("git pull" does a "git fetch" and then a merge, not a rebase.)

Undoing uncommitted changes to a file, "svn revert", is confusingly "git
checkout -- path/to/file" (yes, you both switch branches and undo
uncommitted changes with the same command. Don't know who had that bright
idea.).

Like in SVN, new files have to be "git add"ed. There's also "git rm", "git
mv" etc.

"git commit" will only commit what's been staged. You either have to stage
every changed file with "git add" (not just new files) and then "git
commit", or "git add" any new files and then "git commit -a" which will
include changes to non-new files.

"git log" is very summarized. "git log --name-status" also lists the files
changes in each commit. You can append a path to that to query history only
that file or directory. You can "git show" a commit id (that long
hexadecimal string you see in the git log) to see a diff of the code
changes for that commit.

There is a vast number of commands and options. Start with the basics: add,
commit, branch, checkout, log, show, status, push, pull. Git commands do
explain things quite well, if you take the time to read their output, for
example if a rebase or merge fails, it tells you what commands to run to
fix it and continue, or lets you abort and roll back, the scary "detached
head" message tells you how to make a branch, "git status" tells you what
you can do for files in each state (eg. to "git add" the untracked files).
The man pages for "git merge" and "git rebase" draw nice pictures of what
happens to branches and commits.

Feel free to ask if you have any questions.
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Re: New computer

Patricia Shanahan
Thanks for the write up and links.

On 10/30/2019 11:01 AM, Damjan Jovanovic wrote:

> On Wed, Oct 30, 2019 at 6:16 PM Patricia Shanahan <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> On 10/30/2019 8:13 AM, Damjan Jovanovic wrote:
>>> What do you already know? SVN?
>>
>> RCS, SCCS, and SVN.
>>
>>>
>>> I personally did:
>>> git clone https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/openoffice.git
>>> (ie. not GitHub)
>>> which I think used my Apache credentials. If you prefer to clone from
>>> GitHub, and want to link your Apache and GitHub credentials, you can
>>> apparently do it on:
>>> https://gitbox.apache.org/
>>
>> Any guidance on how to decide which I am likely to prefer?
>>
>>
> It doesn't really matter which you start with, because they're each other's
> mirrors, and in Git you can always change your local repository's "remote".
> For example if you cloned GitHub, and want to switch to GitBox, you don't
> need to clone the GitBox link, you can simply do:
> git remote set-url origin https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/openoffice.git
>
> With GitHub, you can accept GitHub pull requests from other contributors,
> even in your web browser, so it might be a better choice in that regard. I
> can't say I personally approve of the GitHub lock-in for that feature
> though.

I definitely want to avoid GitHub lock-in. I've seen too many services
change their terms to be comfortable depending too much on one.

>
>
>>>
>>> As for how you use Git, if you are interested, I can give you some links,
>>> and my own "Git for SVN users" crash course.
>>
>> Links would be useful. For me when learning programming languages, "for
>> dummies" courses work better than conversion courses. The "for dummies"
>> type of course helps me get into the right mindset for the language. I
>> don't know whether SVN to Git will be different.
>>
>>
> Ok sure:
>
> Graph theory explanations of how branches and Git operations work:
> https://eagain.net/articles/git-for-computer-scientists/

This looks like the best starting point for me. I am very comfortable
with basic graph theory, including DAGs.

>
> The free online book, "Pro Git":
> https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2
>
> A detailed guide to various Git options, written for the Wine project but
> generally useful:
> https://wiki.winehq.org/Git_Wine_Tutorial

> I'll try sum it up for you. For SVN users, Git's terminology is straight
> from hell. "svn checkout X" checks out a working copy from repository X,
> but "git checkout X" switches the current branch to X (among other things).
> Git's equivalent is "git clone" (except that the entire repository with
> full history and all branches is cloned, not just a working copy.) An SVN
> revision is a commit in Git.

So I should really forget SVN, go back to basics, and learn Git on its
own terms from scratch.

I'll read the rest of this after the graph theory web site.

>
> Everything you commit is only committed locally, and can be undone. You
> have to "git push" to send your commits upstream.
>
> The main branch of a project is usually called "master", but in AOO ours is
> called "trunk" since we imported from SVN. The branch you are on at the
> moment is given by "git branch", which lists all the local branches and
> stars the current one. "git status" also shows your current branch and
> files changed.
>
> Remote branches can be shown with "git remote show origin". If you "git
> checkout" with their name, eg. "git checkout AOO418", it will make a local
> branch by that name and switch to it. You can also make a local branch
> remote (somehow).
>
> You make new local branches with "git branch <name>", eg. "git branch
> temp". (It's instantaneous: it doesn't have to copy history or anything
> like that). You can "git checkout temp" to switch to it, "git branch -D
> temp" to delete it. A "detached head" is when you "git checkout" something
> that's not a branch (as you can "git checkout" any commit or tag, not just
> a branch). If you are just looking around, that's not a problem, but if you
> "git commit" on a detached head, that commit isn't referenced from
> anywhere, and if you checkout anything else, you will lose that work. If
> you don't want to lose it, you can "git branch myWork" to attach a branch
> to that new commit, so you can get back to it later (with "git checkout
> myWork").
>
> There are 2 important ways of working with branches, merging and rebasing.
> Both are only local, until you "git push". Merging in Git is similar to
> merging in SVN, changes in one branch get merged into another, but rebasing
> is amazing. With rebasing you can rearrange commits and branches to your
> liking, split commits, merge commits, reorder commits, delete commits,
> change commit messages, reposition an old branch so it starts at a newer
> commit (and deal with outdated code locally in that branch before merging
> or pushing it), etc. "git rebase -i HEAD~3" opens a text editor with the
> last 3 commits, one per line, describing changes you can make by placing a
> keyword at the beginning of its line. If you commit by mistake, do that and
> you can drop the bad commit. Of course with great power comes great
> responsibility, and rebasing should only really be done locally before you
> push, as rebasing commits that were already pushed can mess up other
> people's changes to them.
>
> When changes are made upstream by other contributors, you can "git pull"
> them, but I prefer the more incremental "git fetch" which fetches changes
> without merging them, and then a rebase of my work to come after the latest
> changes - that way I know those changes still apply, even if I don't push
> them yet. ("git pull" does a "git fetch" and then a merge, not a rebase.)
>
> Undoing uncommitted changes to a file, "svn revert", is confusingly "git
> checkout -- path/to/file" (yes, you both switch branches and undo
> uncommitted changes with the same command. Don't know who had that bright
> idea.).
>
> Like in SVN, new files have to be "git add"ed. There's also "git rm", "git
> mv" etc.
>
> "git commit" will only commit what's been staged. You either have to stage
> every changed file with "git add" (not just new files) and then "git
> commit", or "git add" any new files and then "git commit -a" which will
> include changes to non-new files.
>
> "git log" is very summarized. "git log --name-status" also lists the files
> changes in each commit. You can append a path to that to query history only
> that file or directory. You can "git show" a commit id (that long
> hexadecimal string you see in the git log) to see a diff of the code
> changes for that commit.
>
> There is a vast number of commands and options. Start with the basics: add,
> commit, branch, checkout, log, show, status, push, pull. Git commands do
> explain things quite well, if you take the time to read their output, for
> example if a rebase or merge fails, it tells you what commands to run to
> fix it and continue, or lets you abort and roll back, the scary "detached
> head" message tells you how to make a branch, "git status" tells you what
> you can do for files in each state (eg. to "git add" the untracked files).
> The man pages for "git merge" and "git rebase" draw nice pictures of what
> happens to branches and commits.
>
> Feel free to ask if you have any questions.
>

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Re: New computer

Kay Schenk-2
In reply to this post by Damjan Jovanovic

On 10/30/19 11:01 AM, Damjan Jovanovic wrote:

> On Wed, Oct 30, 2019 at 6:16 PM Patricia Shanahan <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> On 10/30/2019 8:13 AM, Damjan Jovanovic wrote:
>>> What do you already know? SVN?
>> RCS, SCCS, and SVN.
>>
>>> I personally did:
>>> git clone https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/openoffice.git
>>> (ie. not GitHub)
>>> which I think used my Apache credentials. If you prefer to clone from
>>> GitHub, and want to link your Apache and GitHub credentials, you can
>>> apparently do it on:
>>> https://gitbox.apache.org/
>> Any guidance on how to decide which I am likely to prefer?
>>
>>
> It doesn't really matter which you start with, because they're each other's
> mirrors, and in Git you can always change your local repository's "remote".
> For example if you cloned GitHub, and want to switch to GitBox, you don't
> need to clone the GitBox link, you can simply do:
> git remote set-url origin https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/openoffice.git
>
> With GitHub, you can accept GitHub pull requests from other contributors,
> even in your web browser, so it might be a better choice in that regard. I
> can't say I personally approve of the GitHub lock-in for that feature
> though.
>
>
>>> As for how you use Git, if you are interested, I can give you some links,
>>> and my own "Git for SVN users" crash course.
>> Links would be useful. For me when learning programming languages, "for
>> dummies" courses work better than conversion courses. The "for dummies"
>> type of course helps me get into the right mindset for the language. I
>> don't know whether SVN to Git will be different.
>>
>>
> Ok sure:
>
> Graph theory explanations of how branches and Git operations work:
> https://eagain.net/articles/git-for-computer-scientists/
>
> The free online book, "Pro Git":
> https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2
>
> A detailed guide to various Git options, written for the Wine project but
> generally useful:
> https://wiki.winehq.org/Git_Wine_Tutorial
>
> I'll try sum it up for you. For SVN users, Git's terminology is straight
> from hell. "svn checkout X" checks out a working copy from repository X,
> but "git checkout X" switches the current branch to X (among other things).
> Git's equivalent is "git clone" (except that the entire repository with
> full history and all branches is cloned, not just a working copy.) An SVN
> revision is a commit in Git.
>
> Everything you commit is only committed locally, and can be undone. You
> have to "git push" to send your commits upstream.
>
> The main branch of a project is usually called "master", but in AOO ours is
> called "trunk" since we imported from SVN. The branch you are on at the
> moment is given by "git branch", which lists all the local branches and
> stars the current one. "git status" also shows your current branch and
> files changed.
>
> Remote branches can be shown with "git remote show origin". If you "git
> checkout" with their name, eg. "git checkout AOO418", it will make a local
> branch by that name and switch to it. You can also make a local branch
> remote (somehow).
>
> You make new local branches with "git branch <name>", eg. "git branch
> temp". (It's instantaneous: it doesn't have to copy history or anything
> like that). You can "git checkout temp" to switch to it, "git branch -D
> temp" to delete it. A "detached head" is when you "git checkout" something
> that's not a branch (as you can "git checkout" any commit or tag, not just
> a branch). If you are just looking around, that's not a problem, but if you
> "git commit" on a detached head, that commit isn't referenced from
> anywhere, and if you checkout anything else, you will lose that work. If
> you don't want to lose it, you can "git branch myWork" to attach a branch
> to that new commit, so you can get back to it later (with "git checkout
> myWork").
>
> There are 2 important ways of working with branches, merging and rebasing.
> Both are only local, until you "git push". Merging in Git is similar to
> merging in SVN, changes in one branch get merged into another, but rebasing
> is amazing. With rebasing you can rearrange commits and branches to your
> liking, split commits, merge commits, reorder commits, delete commits,
> change commit messages, reposition an old branch so it starts at a newer
> commit (and deal with outdated code locally in that branch before merging
> or pushing it), etc. "git rebase -i HEAD~3" opens a text editor with the
> last 3 commits, one per line, describing changes you can make by placing a
> keyword at the beginning of its line. If you commit by mistake, do that and
> you can drop the bad commit. Of course with great power comes great
> responsibility, and rebasing should only really be done locally before you
> push, as rebasing commits that were already pushed can mess up other
> people's changes to them.
>
> When changes are made upstream by other contributors, you can "git pull"
> them, but I prefer the more incremental "git fetch" which fetches changes
> without merging them, and then a rebase of my work to come after the latest
> changes - that way I know those changes still apply, even if I don't push
> them yet. ("git pull" does a "git fetch" and then a merge, not a rebase.)
>
> Undoing uncommitted changes to a file, "svn revert", is confusingly "git
> checkout -- path/to/file" (yes, you both switch branches and undo
> uncommitted changes with the same command. Don't know who had that bright
> idea.).
>
> Like in SVN, new files have to be "git add"ed. There's also "git rm", "git
> mv" etc.
>
> "git commit" will only commit what's been staged. You either have to stage
> every changed file with "git add" (not just new files) and then "git
> commit", or "git add" any new files and then "git commit -a" which will
> include changes to non-new files.
>
> "git log" is very summarized. "git log --name-status" also lists the files
> changes in each commit. You can append a path to that to query history only
> that file or directory. You can "git show" a commit id (that long
> hexadecimal string you see in the git log) to see a diff of the code
> changes for that commit.
>
> There is a vast number of commands and options. Start with the basics: add,
> commit, branch, checkout, log, show, status, push, pull. Git commands do
> explain things quite well, if you take the time to read their output, for
> example if a rebase or merge fails, it tells you what commands to run to
> fix it and continue, or lets you abort and roll back, the scary "detached
> head" message tells you how to make a branch, "git status" tells you what
> you can do for files in each state (eg. to "git add" the untracked files).
> The man pages for "git merge" and "git rebase" draw nice pictures of what
> happens to branches and commits.
>
> Feel free to ask if you have any questions.
>

Thank you Damjen. I too am looking for some "learning git" pointers.

-- Kay