Open Office Writer Critique

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Open Office Writer Critique

Dayvid Artman
First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit arrogant to force me to open
my email in your browser to send this message when I already have my email
open in a different browser. I also don't like the fact that said browser
removes (or at least hides from me) my signature stored in the email
service. But those are not the reason for the message.

You have a function for working with tables that seems to have no useful
purpose, but the title given to it would be quite useful, and there doesn't
seem to be any way to actually do what the name of the function implies.
Microsoft Word has a function with nearly the exact same name, and it
functions as the name suggests and is very handy.

The function in question is “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it is found
under the “Table” menu in the “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the Help on that
topic, and it functions exactly as described, but for no benefit that I can
imagine. The similar “Distribute Columns Evenly” operates nearly identical,
different only in that it is limited by the page size, while rows are not.

What the function does in make every column (or row) match the largest one
in the selection. I can do that in several different ways without using
this function, and the name does not suggest that such will be the outcome.
It isn't “distributing” anything, it is simply expanding each row to the
size of the largest. What I want to do (and what the name implies what and
Microsoft does) is distribute the rows equally or evenly within the area of
the rows selected. The final table would occupy no more, no less, but
exactly the same space as the original, but the spacing of the rows would
all be the same.

This supports providing as much space or as large a font as practical while
keeping a consistent look and staying (for example) on one page. There is
no easy way to do this that I know of without a command such as this. I
must somehow measure the total space that I want the finished table to
occupy, then manually divide that by the number of rows I want, and then
size each one to that size. Given certain scenarios, one could do that last
step en mass, but the first two steps are cumbersome and tedious. The
computer could do that in a moment, just as quickly as it does what it does
now, but with far more benefit.

I strongly urge the team at Apache to consider making this design change.

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RE: Open Office Writer Critique

Isaac Schrader
If you have errors how about you fix them yourself?





Sent from my Windows 10 phone



From: Dayvid Artman<mailto:[hidden email]>
Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 4:17 PM
To: [hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>
Subject: Open Office Writer Critique



First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit arrogant to force me to open
my email in your browser to send this message when I already have my email
open in a different browser. I also don't like the fact that said browser
removes (or at least hides from me) my signature stored in the email
service. But those are not the reason for the message.

You have a function for working with tables that seems to have no useful
purpose, but the title given to it would be quite useful, and there doesn't
seem to be any way to actually do what the name of the function implies.
Microsoft Word has a function with nearly the exact same name, and it
functions as the name suggests and is very handy.

The function in question is “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it is found
under the “Table” menu in the “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the Help on that
topic, and it functions exactly as described, but for no benefit that I can
imagine. The similar “Distribute Columns Evenly” operates nearly identical,
different only in that it is limited by the page size, while rows are not.

What the function does in make every column (or row) match the largest one
in the selection. I can do that in several different ways without using
this function, and the name does not suggest that such will be the outcome.
It isn't “distributing” anything, it is simply expanding each row to the
size of the largest. What I want to do (and what the name implies what and
Microsoft does) is distribute the rows equally or evenly within the area of
the rows selected. The final table would occupy no more, no less, but
exactly the same space as the original, but the spacing of the rows would
all be the same.

This supports providing as much space or as large a font as practical while
keeping a consistent look and staying (for example) on one page. There is
no easy way to do this that I know of without a command such as this. I
must somehow measure the total space that I want the finished table to
occupy, then manually divide that by the number of rows I want, and then
size each one to that size. Given certain scenarios, one could do that last
step en mass, but the first two steps are cumbersome and tedious. The
computer could do that in a moment, just as quickly as it does what it does
now, but with far more benefit.

I strongly urge the team at Apache to consider making this design change.

<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Chuck Davis
In reply to this post by Dayvid Artman
The project is always accepting code donations from the volunteers who make
the office suite.  If you would like to donate your code I am sure you would find
a welcoming place to publish your code.

On Saturday, June 17, 2017 2:09:38 PM PDT Dayvid Artman wrote:

> First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit arrogant to force me to open
> my email in your browser to send this message when I already have my email
> open in a different browser. I also don't like the fact that said browser
> removes (or at least hides from me) my signature stored in the email
> service. But those are not the reason for the message.
>
> You have a function for working with tables that seems to have no useful
> purpose, but the title given to it would be quite useful, and there doesn't
> seem to be any way to actually do what the name of the function implies.
> Microsoft Word has a function with nearly the exact same name, and it
> functions as the name suggests and is very handy.
>
> The function in question is “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it is found
> under the “Table” menu in the “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the Help on that
> topic, and it functions exactly as described, but for no benefit that I can
> imagine. The similar “Distribute Columns Evenly” operates nearly identical,
> different only in that it is limited by the page size, while rows are not.
>
> What the function does in make every column (or row) match the largest one
> in the selection. I can do that in several different ways without using
> this function, and the name does not suggest that such will be the outcome.
> It isn't “distributing” anything, it is simply expanding each row to the
> size of the largest. What I want to do (and what the name implies what and
> Microsoft does) is distribute the rows equally or evenly within the area of
> the rows selected. The final table would occupy no more, no less, but
> exactly the same space as the original, but the spacing of the rows would
> all be the same.
>
> This supports providing as much space or as large a font as practical while
> keeping a consistent look and staying (for example) on one page. There is
> no easy way to do this that I know of without a command such as this. I
> must somehow measure the total space that I want the finished table to
> occupy, then manually divide that by the number of rows I want, and then
> size each one to that size. Given certain scenarios, one could do that last
> step en mass, but the first two steps are cumbersome and tedious. The
> computer could do that in a moment, just as quickly as it does what it does
> now, but with far more benefit.
>
> I strongly urge the team at Apache to consider making this design change.
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campai
> gn=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campai
> gn=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#m_2364816453849307028_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>



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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

larry phillips
In reply to this post by Dayvid Artman
I find it slightly amusing that people get something for free and then choose to complain
that it doesn't have all the bells and whistles that they want or they might have to take an extra step to
do a function. I find Microsquish every complicated and expensive. Every time they come out with a new
verson it is a sales tool for the office suite  Larry Phillips
--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 6/17/17, Dayvid Artman <[hidden email]> wrote:

 Subject: Open Office Writer Critique
 To: [hidden email]
 Date: Saturday, June 17, 2017, 5:09 PM
 
 First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit
 arrogant to force me to open
 my email in your browser to send this
 message when I already have my email
 open in a different browser. I also
 don't like the fact that said browser
 removes (or at least hides from me) my
 signature stored in the email
 service. But those are not the reason
 for the message.
 
 You have a function for working with
 tables that seems to have no useful
 purpose, but the title given to it
 would be quite useful, and there doesn't
 seem to be any way to actually do what
 the name of the function implies.
 Microsoft Word has a function with
 nearly the exact same name, and it
 functions as the name suggests and is
 very handy.
 
 The function in question is
 “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it is found
 under the “Table” menu in the
 “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the Help on that
 topic, and it functions exactly as
 described, but for no benefit that I can
 imagine. The similar “Distribute
 Columns Evenly” operates nearly identical,
 different only in that it is limited by
 the page size, while rows are not.
 
 What the function does in make every
 column (or row) match the largest one
 in the selection. I can do that in
 several different ways without using
 this function, and the name does not
 suggest that such will be the outcome.
 It isn't “distributing” anything,
 it is simply expanding each row to the
 size of the largest. What I want to do
 (and what the name implies what and
 Microsoft does) is distribute the rows
 equally or evenly within the area of
 the rows selected. The final table
 would occupy no more, no less, but
 exactly the same space as the original,
 but the spacing of the rows would
 all be the same.
 
 This supports providing as much space
 or as large a font as practical while
 keeping a consistent look and staying
 (for example) on one page. There is
 no easy way to do this that I know of
 without a command such as this. I
 must somehow measure the total space
 that I want the finished table to
 occupy, then manually divide that by
 the number of rows I want, and then
 size each one to that size. Given
 certain scenarios, one could do that last
 step en mass, but the first two steps
 are cumbersome and tedious. The
 computer could do that in a moment,
 just as quickly as it does what it does
 now, but with far more benefit.
 
 I strongly urge the team at Apache to
 consider making this design change.
 
 <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
 Virus-free.
 www.avast.com
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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Martin Groenescheij
In reply to this post by Dayvid Artman


On 18/06/17 7:09 AM, Dayvid Artman wrote:
> First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit arrogant to force me to open
> my email in your browser to send this message when I already have my email
> open in a different browser.

The real annoying thing is when people complain about something that's
not part of OpenOffice.
OpenOffice doesn't have a browser so it doesn't force you to open it
with a certain browser.

>   I also don't like the fact that said browser
> removes (or at least hides from me) my signature stored in the email
> service. But those are not the reason for the message.

Again that's not part of OpenOffice

>
> You have a function for working with tables that seems to have no useful
> purpose, but the title given to it would be quite useful, and there doesn't
> seem to be any way to actually do what the name of the function implies.

What are you referring to? What title, you even don't tell which part of
OpenOffice you are using.

> Microsoft Word has a function with nearly the exact same name, and it
> functions as the name suggests and is very handy.

What function you are referring to? I have no idea.

>
> The function in question is “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it is found
> under the “Table” menu in the “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the Help on that
> topic, and it functions exactly as described, but for no benefit that I can
> imagine. The similar “Distribute Columns Evenly” operates nearly identical,
> different only in that it is limited by the page size, while rows are not.
>
> What the function does in make every column (or row) match the largest one
> in the selection.

That depends on your selection: Optimal Row Height or Distribute Rows
equally

> I can do that in several different ways without using
> this function, and the name does not suggest that such will be the outcome.

Could it be that you have a wrong perception what the outcome will be?

> It isn't “distributing” anything, it is simply expanding each row to the
> size of the largest. What I want to do (and what the name implies what and
> Microsoft does) is distribute the rows equally or evenly within the area of
> the rows selected.

Well that's what my version (4.1.3) of OpenOffice does.
And by the way OpenOffice never is, was or will be a clone of MS Office,
so don't expect that
it act as MS Office it does the things it was designed for.

> The final table would occupy no more, no less, but
> exactly the same space as the original, but the spacing of the rows would
> all be the same.

Now you lost me. The final table will only be the same if you don't
distribute the rows equally or
select optimal row height.

>
> This supports providing as much space or as large a font as practical while
> keeping a consistent look and staying (for example) on one page. There is
> no easy way to do this that I know of without a command such as this. I
> must somehow measure the total space that I want the finished table to
> occupy, then manually divide that by the number of rows I want, and then
> size each one to that size. Given certain scenarios, one could do that last
> step en mass, but the first two steps are cumbersome and tedious. The
> computer could do that in a moment, just as quickly as it does what it does
> now, but with far more benefit.
>
> I strongly urge the team at Apache to consider making this design change.

I strongly urge you to check the Table Properties window

>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
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>


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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Dayvid Artman
In reply to this post by Isaac Schrader
I don't know what you are referring to. I don't have any errors that I know
of, and that has nothing to do with the topic. The issue is that I cannot
figure out how to do what this function name implies it does but does not.


On Sat, Jun 17, 2017 at 4:21 PM, Isaac Schrader <[hidden email]
> wrote:

> If you have errors how about you fix them yourself?
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my Windows 10 phone
>
>
>
> From: Dayvid Artman<mailto:[hidden email]>
> Sent: Saturday, June 17, 2017 4:17 PM
> To: [hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>
> Subject: Open Office Writer Critique
>
>
>
> First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit arrogant to force me to open
> my email in your browser to send this message when I already have my email
> open in a different browser. I also don't like the fact that said browser
> removes (or at least hides from me) my signature stored in the email
> service. But those are not the reason for the message.
>
> You have a function for working with tables that seems to have no useful
> purpose, but the title given to it would be quite useful, and there doesn't
> seem to be any way to actually do what the name of the function implies.
> Microsoft Word has a function with nearly the exact same name, and it
> functions as the name suggests and is very handy.
>
> The function in question is “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it is found
> under the “Table” menu in the “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the Help on that
> topic, and it functions exactly as described, but for no benefit that I can
> imagine. The similar “Distribute Columns Evenly” operates nearly identical,
> different only in that it is limited by the page size, while rows are not.
>
> What the function does in make every column (or row) match the largest one
> in the selection. I can do that in several different ways without using
> this function, and the name does not suggest that such will be the outcome.
> It isn't “distributing” anything, it is simply expanding each row to the
> size of the largest. What I want to do (and what the name implies what and
> Microsoft does) is distribute the rows equally or evenly within the area of
> the rows selected. The final table would occupy no more, no less, but
> exactly the same space as the original, but the spacing of the rows would
> all be the same.
>
> This supports providing as much space or as large a font as practical while
> keeping a consistent look and staying (for example) on one page. There is
> no easy way to do this that I know of without a command such as this. I
> must somehow measure the total space that I want the finished table to
> occupy, then manually divide that by the number of rows I want, and then
> size each one to that size. Given certain scenarios, one could do that last
> step en mass, but the first two steps are cumbersome and tedious. The
> computer could do that in a moment, just as quickly as it does what it does
> now, but with far more benefit.
>
> I strongly urge the team at Apache to consider making this design change.
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_
> source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_
> source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#m_2364816453849307028_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>
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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Dayvid Artman
In reply to this post by Chuck Davis
I have no clue how to do that.





On Sat, Jun 17, 2017 at 6:31 PM, <[hidden email]> wrote:

> The project is always accepting code donations from the volunteers who make
> the office suite.  If you would like to donate your code I am sure you
> would find
> a welcoming place to publish your code.
>
> On Saturday, June 17, 2017 2:09:38 PM PDT Dayvid Artman wrote:
> > First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit arrogant to force me to open
> > my email in your browser to send this message when I already have my
> email
> > open in a different browser. I also don't like the fact that said browser
> > removes (or at least hides from me) my signature stored in the email
> > service. But those are not the reason for the message.
> >
> > You have a function for working with tables that seems to have no useful
> > purpose, but the title given to it would be quite useful, and there
> doesn't
> > seem to be any way to actually do what the name of the function implies.
> > Microsoft Word has a function with nearly the exact same name, and it
> > functions as the name suggests and is very handy.
> >
> > The function in question is “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it is found
> > under the “Table” menu in the “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the Help on that
> > topic, and it functions exactly as described, but for no benefit that I
> can
> > imagine. The similar “Distribute Columns Evenly” operates nearly
> identical,
> > different only in that it is limited by the page size, while rows are
> not.
> >
> > What the function does in make every column (or row) match the largest
> one
> > in the selection. I can do that in several different ways without using
> > this function, and the name does not suggest that such will be the
> outcome.
> > It isn't “distributing” anything, it is simply expanding each row to the
> > size of the largest. What I want to do (and what the name implies what
> and
> > Microsoft does) is distribute the rows equally or evenly within the area
> of
> > the rows selected. The final table would occupy no more, no less, but
> > exactly the same space as the original, but the spacing of the rows would
> > all be the same.
> >
> > This supports providing as much space or as large a font as practical
> while
> > keeping a consistent look and staying (for example) on one page. There is
> > no easy way to do this that I know of without a command such as this. I
> > must somehow measure the total space that I want the finished table to
> > occupy, then manually divide that by the number of rows I want, and then
> > size each one to that size. Given certain scenarios, one could do that
> last
> > step en mass, but the first two steps are cumbersome and tedious. The
> > computer could do that in a moment, just as quickly as it does what it
> does
> > now, but with far more benefit.
> >
> > I strongly urge the team at Apache to consider making this design change.
> >
> > <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_
> source=link&utm_campai
> > gn=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
> > www.avast.com
> > <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_
> source=link&utm_campai
> > gn=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> > <#m_2364816453849307028_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>
>
>
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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Dayvid Artman
In reply to this post by larry phillips
I don't disagree with your jist. I simple clicked on the link for feedback
and provided some. I only referenced MS because I have some experience with
that through a past employer, and it seems to function as I suspect this
was supposed to. But apparently that link was just in fun, because I have
been barraged with emails telling me that I should not have sent it, some
of them extremely demeaning and even vulgar.



On Sat, Jun 17, 2017 at 10:25 PM, larry phillips <
[hidden email]> wrote:

> I find it slightly amusing that people get something for free and then
> choose to complain
> that it doesn't have all the bells and whistles that they want or they
> might have to take an extra step to
> do a function. I find Microsquish every complicated and expensive. Every
> time they come out with a new
> verson it is a sales tool for the office suite  Larry Phillips
> --------------------------------------------
> On Sat, 6/17/17, Dayvid Artman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>  Subject: Open Office Writer Critique
>  To: [hidden email]
>  Date: Saturday, June 17, 2017, 5:09 PM
>
>  First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit
>  arrogant to force me to open
>  my email in your browser to send this
>  message when I already have my email
>  open in a different browser. I also
>  don't like the fact that said browser
>  removes (or at least hides from me) my
>  signature stored in the email
>  service. But those are not the reason
>  for the message.
>
>  You have a function for working with
>  tables that seems to have no useful
>  purpose, but the title given to it
>  would be quite useful, and there doesn't
>  seem to be any way to actually do what
>  the name of the function implies.
>  Microsoft Word has a function with
>  nearly the exact same name, and it
>  functions as the name suggests and is
>  very handy.
>
>  The function in question is
>  “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it is found
>  under the “Table” menu in the
>  “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the Help on that
>  topic, and it functions exactly as
>  described, but for no benefit that I can
>  imagine. The similar “Distribute
>  Columns Evenly” operates nearly identical,
>  different only in that it is limited by
>  the page size, while rows are not.
>
>  What the function does in make every
>  column (or row) match the largest one
>  in the selection. I can do that in
>  several different ways without using
>  this function, and the name does not
>  suggest that such will be the outcome.
>  It isn't “distributing” anything,
>  it is simply expanding each row to the
>  size of the largest. What I want to do
>  (and what the name implies what and
>  Microsoft does) is distribute the rows
>  equally or evenly within the area of
>  the rows selected. The final table
>  would occupy no more, no less, but
>  exactly the same space as the original,
>  but the spacing of the rows would
>  all be the same.
>
>  This supports providing as much space
>  or as large a font as practical while
>  keeping a consistent look and staying
>  (for example) on one page. There is
>  no easy way to do this that I know of
>  without a command such as this. I
>  must somehow measure the total space
>  that I want the finished table to
>  occupy, then manually divide that by
>  the number of rows I want, and then
>  size each one to that size. Given
>  certain scenarios, one could do that last
>  step en mass, but the first two steps
>  are cumbersome and tedious. The
>  computer could do that in a moment,
>  just as quickly as it does what it does
>  now, but with far more benefit.
>
>  I strongly urge the team at Apache to
>  consider making this design change.
>
>  <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_
> source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Dave Fisher
Hi -

What happens if you select the whole table. Click on the bottom of the table and hold dragging up or down? Does that work for you?

Best Regards,
Dave

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 19, 2017, at 8:35 PM, Dayvid Artman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I don't disagree with your jist. I simple clicked on the link for feedback
> and provided some. I only referenced MS because I have some experience with
> that through a past employer, and it seems to function as I suspect this
> was supposed to. But apparently that link was just in fun, because I have
> been barraged with emails telling me that I should not have sent it, some
> of them extremely demeaning and even vulgar.
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 17, 2017 at 10:25 PM, larry phillips <
> [hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> I find it slightly amusing that people get something for free and then
>> choose to complain
>> that it doesn't have all the bells and whistles that they want or they
>> might have to take an extra step to
>> do a function. I find Microsquish every complicated and expensive. Every
>> time they come out with a new
>> verson it is a sales tool for the office suite  Larry Phillips
>> --------------------------------------------
>> On Sat, 6/17/17, Dayvid Artman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> Subject: Open Office Writer Critique
>> To: [hidden email]
>> Date: Saturday, June 17, 2017, 5:09 PM
>>
>> First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit
>> arrogant to force me to open
>> my email in your browser to send this
>> message when I already have my email
>> open in a different browser. I also
>> don't like the fact that said browser
>> removes (or at least hides from me) my
>> signature stored in the email
>> service. But those are not the reason
>> for the message.
>>
>> You have a function for working with
>> tables that seems to have no useful
>> purpose, but the title given to it
>> would be quite useful, and there doesn't
>> seem to be any way to actually do what
>> the name of the function implies.
>> Microsoft Word has a function with
>> nearly the exact same name, and it
>> functions as the name suggests and is
>> very handy.
>>
>> The function in question is
>> “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it is found
>> under the “Table” menu in the
>> “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the Help on that
>> topic, and it functions exactly as
>> described, but for no benefit that I can
>> imagine. The similar “Distribute
>> Columns Evenly” operates nearly identical,
>> different only in that it is limited by
>> the page size, while rows are not.
>>
>> What the function does in make every
>> column (or row) match the largest one
>> in the selection. I can do that in
>> several different ways without using
>> this function, and the name does not
>> suggest that such will be the outcome.
>> It isn't “distributing” anything,
>> it is simply expanding each row to the
>> size of the largest. What I want to do
>> (and what the name implies what and
>> Microsoft does) is distribute the rows
>> equally or evenly within the area of
>> the rows selected. The final table
>> would occupy no more, no less, but
>> exactly the same space as the original,
>> but the spacing of the rows would
>> all be the same.
>>
>> This supports providing as much space
>> or as large a font as practical while
>> keeping a consistent look and staying
>> (for example) on one page. There is
>> no easy way to do this that I know of
>> without a command such as this. I
>> must somehow measure the total space
>> that I want the finished table to
>> occupy, then manually divide that by
>> the number of rows I want, and then
>> size each one to that size. Given
>> certain scenarios, one could do that last
>> step en mass, but the first two steps
>> are cumbersome and tedious. The
>> computer could do that in a moment,
>> just as quickly as it does what it does
>> now, but with far more benefit.
>>
>> I strongly urge the team at Apache to
>> consider making this design change.
>>
>> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_
>> source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Martin Groenescheij
In reply to this post by Dayvid Artman


On 20/06/17 2:44 PM, Dayvid Artman wrote:
> Gentlemen,
>
> I am responding to your replies coincident as they almost seem like
> carbon copies in many ways.

No it's not a coincident that the replies look like carbon copies, it's
a proof that we're on the same line with our thoughts.

>
> WOW! Are we defensive or what?

Well, you started to use the word Critique in the subject.
According to the dictionary this word means "the art of criticism" and
criticism is "a severe or unfavorable judgement".
At the beginning of your email you start with "it is annoying and seems
a bit arrogant" etc.

You are writing to a user mailing list, these users are voluntarily
helping others. We are not programmers or developers
so all we can do is giving advice or workarounds all within the
limitations of our own knowledge.
If you had started your email with explaining your problem instead of
your frustration you probably had received a different answer.

>
> Regarding the browser, maybe it isn't "yours", but it opened when I
> clicked on the email link in Open Office help, it looks like a
> browser, I had never seen that interface before, no program name was
> discoverable that I know of, and I coud not figure a way to get that
> communication back to a familiar environment. It had all the feel of
> my having been hijacked to a proprietary application. And the only way
> I have been able to get that UI back is to execute a link from within
> the Open Office Help environment. Maybe it isn't part of Open Office,
> but something in Open office is calling it, none of my other
> applications call that interface, and I haven't found any other way of
> getting to it except through the Open Office Help routine. I don't
> know what it is, but it looks like an Open office thing to me.
>
> Now, regarding my error in sending this message to all of you, I
> simply followed a link within that Help routine that was labelled to
> provide feedback. If that isn't the appropriate way to do that, then
> for Pete's sake somebody change that link. And in the meantime, don't
> jump down somebody's throat for doing what they thought they were
> supposed to do.
>
> Regarding the thrust of my feedback, both of you completely ignore or
> turn totally inside out the explanation of what I presented. I have
> read and reread my original words, and your interpretations of that
> take some real imagination. I don't know how I could have made it much
> more clear what I expected it to do and what it does instead, but that
> is worlds away from the mayhem you tow throw back at me. I will repeat
> here this part of what I said earlier: I can't image any use for what
> it actually does. Your descriptions are like from a different planet,
> introducing issues that are completely irrelevant as far as I can
> tell, and you made no effort to explain how they might relate.
>
> Both of you assert that Open Office isn't and never was intended to be
> a clone of MS. I never suggested that it is or should be. I simply
> pointed out that a nearly identically named function in MS does do
> what the name implies, and OO does not. Furthermore, everybody knows
> that your assertion is a half truth at best. The developers of OO have
> striven to make the transition between the two as easy on the user as
> possible and tried to eliminate as many hurdles as possible for
> persons making the move to OO. I am a pretty intense user of
> spreadsheets, and I have used both Excel and Calc extensively. Calc is
> an exact clone of Excel in almost every way. The only difference that
> I can think of at the moment is the use of a semicolon for a parameter
> separator rather than the comma that Excel uses. I don't quite get why
> that difference exists, unless for copyright reasons. I don't have any
> particular grief with the similarly, although Gates might. I think it
> is wise on your part. Even the existence of that very function looks
> very suspiciously like an effort to emulate MS. It just doesn't work
> the same.
>
> One of you also repeatedly questioned why I don't just use MS if I
> like it better. There are two fallacies in that argument. Firstly, I
> didn't say that I liked MS better. I simple offered this one function
> that I like better in that package and plead for inclusion of that in
> OO. I had the impression until I actually tried it that OO wanted
> suggestions from their users about things they liked and disliked.
> Apparently that is a ruse. Secondly, most users don't have a choice
> which of the two to use. Employers supply a computer and software, and
> employees are pretty much relegated to whatever that is, whether they
> like it or not. Your reaction is like me going into Sears and asking
> if they carry Michelin tires, and the clerk yelling "No, we don't
> carry Michelin tires, and if you don't like the tires we sell, then go
> to Walmart!" That would be just as ludicrous as your responses. A wise
> clerk would say something like, " I'm sorry sir, but we don't carry
> Michelin. They make a pretty good tire, and they are noted for long
> tire life and a quiet ride. We have a tire over here from a different
> manufacturer that has an identical milage warrenty as the most popular
> Michelin, and it has an amazingly quiet ride." But apparently, you two
> have no interest in showing me the benefits of OO, only blasting me to
> articulating a perceived shortcoming.
>
> So a couple of technical points...
>
> Martin says that the table will only be the same size if you don't
> distribute the rows. That is my point. It should be. Distributing the
> rows evenly should make them fill exactly the same total height as
> before, but with each row occupying an equal fraction of that height.
> If that isn't what it is intended to do, then the purpose of it
> escapes me. What it does do does not require a function or menu item.
> There are many ways to accomplish that, as I previously stated. And
> the reason that you both bring up changing fonts also escapes me, as
> the topic has no effect on fonts and is not affected by fonts in any
> way. It should work equally on empty cells and on cells with far more
> content than can display and on anything in between. Controlling the
> content is a completely separate discussion. In my case, all of the
> cells were completely empty except for the paragraph mark, and all
> rows were far taller both before and after the adjustment than was
> needed for that mark.
>
> Martin ends by sarcastically suggesting that I check the table
> properties. There is nothing wrong with the table properties, and like
> fonts, that has no bearing on the topic either as far as I can tell. I
> got the results I wanted by determining the overall (total) height of
> the rows that I wanted proportioned into the space they currently
> occupied, calculated the even proportion that each row would need to
> occupy, and then set that value with the key-in of the row height. The
> table works just fine. The process just makes getting there more work
> that it seems like it should be. And if there is a way to do this that
> I haven't found, a more productive and civilized response would have
> been to point out that method to me.
>
> Good day, gentlemen.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, Jun 18, 2017 at 4:33 AM, Martin Groenescheij
> <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>
>
>     On 18/06/17 7:09 AM, Dayvid Artman wrote:
>
>         First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit arrogant to force
>         me to open
>         my email in your browser to send this message when I already
>         have my email
>         open in a different browser.
>
>
>     The real annoying thing is when people complain about something
>     that's not part of OpenOffice.
>     OpenOffice doesn't have a browser so it doesn't force you to open
>     it with a certain browser.
>
>           I also don't like the fact that said browser
>         removes (or at least hides from me) my signature stored in the
>         email
>         service. But those are not the reason for the message.
>
>
>     Again that's not part of OpenOffice
>
>
>         You have a function for working with tables that seems to have
>         no useful
>         purpose, but the title given to it would be quite useful, and
>         there doesn't
>         seem to be any way to actually do what the name of the
>         function implies.
>
>
>     What are you referring to? What title, you even don't tell which
>     part of OpenOffice you are using.
>
>         Microsoft Word has a function with nearly the exact same name,
>         and it
>         functions as the name suggests and is very handy.
>
>
>     What function you are referring to? I have no idea.
>
>
>         The function in question is “Distribute Rows Equally”, and it
>         is found
>         under the “Table” menu in the “Autofit” sub-menu. I read the
>         Help on that
>         topic, and it functions exactly as described, but for no
>         benefit that I can
>         imagine. The similar “Distribute Columns Evenly” operates
>         nearly identical,
>         different only in that it is limited by the page size, while
>         rows are not.
>
>         What the function does in make every column (or row) match the
>         largest one
>         in the selection.
>
>
>     That depends on your selection: Optimal Row Height or Distribute
>     Rows equally
>
>         I can do that in several different ways without using
>         this function, and the name does not suggest that such will be
>         the outcome.
>
>
>     Could it be that you have a wrong perception what the outcome will be?
>
>         It isn't “distributing” anything, it is simply expanding each
>         row to the
>         size of the largest. What I want to do (and what the name
>         implies what and
>         Microsoft does) is distribute the rows equally or evenly
>         within the area of
>         the rows selected.
>
>
>     Well that's what my version (4.1.3) of OpenOffice does.
>     And by the way OpenOffice never is, was or will be a clone of MS
>     Office, so don't expect that
>     it act as MS Office it does the things it was designed for.
>
>         The final table would occupy no more, no less, but
>         exactly the same space as the original, but the spacing of the
>         rows would
>         all be the same.
>
>
>     Now you lost me. The final table will only be the same if you
>     don't distribute the rows equally or
>     select optimal row height.
>
>
>         This supports providing as much space or as large a font as
>         practical while
>         keeping a consistent look and staying (for example) on one
>         page. There is
>         no easy way to do this that I know of without a command such
>         as this. I
>         must somehow measure the total space that I want the finished
>         table to
>         occupy, then manually divide that by the number of rows I
>         want, and then
>         size each one to that size. Given certain scenarios, one could
>         do that last
>         step en mass, but the first two steps are cumbersome and
>         tedious. The
>         computer could do that in a moment, just as quickly as it does
>         what it does
>         now, but with far more benefit.
>
>         I strongly urge the team at Apache to consider making this
>         design change.
>
>
>     I strongly urge you to check the Table Properties window
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, Jun 18, 2017 at 11:38 PM, Brian Barker
> <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     At 14:09 17/06/2017 -0700, you wrote:
>
>         First of all, it is annoying and seems a bit arrogant to force
>         me to open my email in your browser to send this message when
>         I already have my email open in a different browser.
>
>
>     There are layers of misunderstanding here; where to start?
>
>     o OpenOffice does not provide a browser, so no-one can know what
>     you might mean by "your browser".
>
>     o You can send a message to any e-mail address from any e-mail
>     client or system, of course, so no-one is forcing you to do
>     anything. If you chose to do something other than pasting an
>     address into your normal mail procedure, that was your choice -
>     no-one else's.
>
>     o Are you perhaps clicking on a mailto: link in a web page or
>     similar? If so, this will start a new message in whatever is the
>     mail client you have chosen on your system. But such a link cannot
>     work through a web interface to mail, so if you are choosing to
>     use a browser to access your mail you will need to harvest the
>     address and to transfer it there manually. That's all about how
>     you have set up your computer system and how you use it - nothing
>     whatever to do with OpenOffice. Any mailto: link in a web page
>     will behave similarly.
>
>     o You wrote to a mailing list which, as its name ("Users")
>     suggests, is composed mainly of users of OpenOffice - just like
>     you and me. So it is not "my" or "our" software (or fictional
>     browser), in fact, and you were not writing to OpenOffice itself.
>     Any replies you may receive will not be authoritative.
>
>         I also don't like the fact that said browser removes (or at
>         least hides from me) my signature stored in the email service.
>
>
>     If you use the web interface to your mail, you will have saved
>     your signature remotely - in Gmail's systems. And If you indeed
>     had now opened a default mail client on your PC (perhaps Windows
>     Mail?), your Gmail signature and similar things will certainly not
>     be there, of course.
>
>         You have a function ...
>
>
>     Again, *I* don't have anything. I hope we are both talking about
>     OpenOffice.
>
>         ... for working with tables that seems to have no useful
>         purpose, but the title given to it would be quite useful, and
>         there doesn't seem to be any way to actually do what the name
>         of the function implies. Microsoft Word has a function with
>         nearly the exact same name, and it functions as the name
>         suggests and is very handy.
>
>
>     If you prefer Microsoft Word, please remember that it is very
>     straightforward to purchase a licence for it and to install and
>     use it.
>
>         The function in question is "Distribute Rows Equally" , and it
>         is found under the "Table"  menu in the "Autofit"  sub-menu. I
>         read the Help on that topic, and it functions exactly as
>         described, but for no benefit that I can imagine.
>
>
>     I don't see why your imagination should be required to be a brake
>     on what happens for others. Isn't this like purchasing a map and
>     complaining that it includes many places your are unlikely to
>     visit and roads you are unlikely ever to use? Or saying that the
>     piano keyboard is to long and you can't see why anyone would want
>     notes that high or that low? Of course there will be many
>     facilities in any software that you will personally find no use for.
>
>         It isn't "distributing"  anything, ...
>
>
>     I suspect you are right. It's interesting that one page of the
>     help text headlines this as "Space Rows Equally" instead.
>
>         What I want to do (and what the name implies what and
>         Microsoft does) ...
>
>
>     Again, if you prefer Microsoft Word, why not use it? Why make life
>     unpleasant for yourself by using something you deprecate, rightly
>     or wrongly?
>
>         ... is distribute the rows equally or evenly within the area
>         of the rows selected. The final table would occupy no more, no
>         less, but exactly the same space as the original, ...
>
>
>     I think "exactly the same" deals with both "no more" and "no less" ...
>
>         ... but the spacing of the rows would all be the same. This
>         supports providing as much space or as large a font as
>         practical while keeping a consistent look and staying (for
>         example) on one page.
>
>
>     Suggesting that font sizes would be automatically adjusted is a
>     big requirement, of course - and probably goes against the idea of
>     using styles for formatting. Paragraph styles and character styles
>     each have a font size specification. If the font size is messed up
>     independently, what happens to the style association? If the font
>     size in the style is, say, 12 point and this is reduced to 10
>     point to fit the text in a particular table cell, what then
>     happens if the style is modified to 11 point? Does this affect the
>     reduced text or has it lost its style? If it hasn't, is the text
>     now enlarged to 11 point or reduced to 9 point or left at 10
>     point, or what? Perhaps you haven't thought through the effect of
>     this idea on styles.
>
>         There is no easy way to do this that I know of without a
>         command such as this. I must somehow measure the total space
>         that I want the finished table to occupy, then manually divide
>         that by the number of rows I want, and then size each one to
>         that size. Given certain scenarios, one could do that last
>         step en mass, but the first two steps are cumbersome and
>         tedious. The computer could do that in a moment, just as
>         quickly as it does what it does now, but with far more benefit.
>
>
>     I think this is easier than you suggest. Select all the rows in
>     the table (Ctrl+A twice), right-click and go to Row > | Height...,
>     untick "Fit to size", and adjust the single value for Height for
>     the appearance you wish to see. Any cell that is now over-full
>     with text will display a red triangular arrow where the text
>     spills over. Now select these cells individually and adjust the
>     font size to suit.
>
>     But I'm not sure I'd ever want to do this. A document that
>     adjusted font sizes apparently randomly just to fit different
>     amounts of text into the same size table cells would be very messy
>     and unattractive. How about changing the font size in a book so
>     that each chapter occupies exactly the same number of pages? You'd
>     be alarmed to find you'd bought a book like that. Perhaps it's
>     precisely because no-one (or few) would want to do this or that
>     the developers do not see it as desirable that an easier method
>     should be provided.
>
>         I strongly urge the team at Apache to consider making this
>         design change.
>
>
>     You can suggest enhancements at the web site, using the same
>     mechanism as is used to report bugs. See
>     https://wiki.openoffice.org/wiki/QA/HowToFileIssue
>     <https://wiki.openoffice.org/wiki/QA/HowToFileIssue> and
>     https://bz.apache.org/ooo/ .
>
>     But do remember that the fact that Microsoft Word does something
>     one way is not considered a reason for OpenOffice to do it that
>     way too. OpenOffice is not intended to be (and never will be) a
>     free clone of Microsoft Office. Microsoft Office is readily
>     available for anyone who prefers to use it.
>
>     I trust this helps.
>
>     Brian Barker - privately
>
>

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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Larry Gusaas-4
On 2017-06-20, 12:32 AM Martin Groenescheij wrote:

> Well, you started to use the word Critique in the subject.
> According to the dictionary this word means "the art of criticism" and criticism is "a severe
> or unfavorable judgement".

That is not a good definition of critique.
 From Oxford Dictionary of English:

    critique|krɪˈtiːk|nouna detailed analysis and assessment of something, especially a
    literary, philosophical, or political theory:a critique of Marxist
    historicism.verb(critiques,critiquing,critiqued)[withobject]evaluate (a theory orpractice)
    in adetailedand analytical way:the authors critique the methods andpracticesused in
    theresearch.ORIGINmid 17thcentury(as a noun): fromFrench, based onGreekkritikē
    tekhnē‘criticalart’.



--
_________________________________

Larry I. Gusaas
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan Canada
Website: http://larry-gusaas.com
"An artist is never ahead of his time but most people are far behind theirs." - Edgard Varese

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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Martin Groenescheij


On 20/06/17 5:04 PM, Larry Gusaas wrote:

> On 2017-06-20, 12:32 AM Martin Groenescheij wrote:
>
>> Well, you started to use the word Critique in the subject.
>> According to the dictionary this word means "the art of criticism"
>> and criticism is "a severe or unfavorable judgement".
>
> That is not a good definition of critique.
> From Oxford Dictionary of English:
>
>    critique|krɪˈtiːk|nouna detailed analysis and assessment of
> something, especially a
>    literary, philosophical, or political theory:a critique of Marxist
> historicism.verb(critiques,critiquing,critiqued)[withobject]evaluate
> (a theory orpractice)
>    in adetailedand analytical way:the authors critique the methods
> andpracticesused in
>    theresearch.ORIGINmid 17thcentury(as a noun): fromFrench, based
> onGreekkritikē
>    tekhnē‘criticalart’.
>
>
Different Dictionaries have different descriptions / explanations of
Critique, but they all come down to criticising something.
The Original Poster only expressed his frustration he did not asked for
help.
The purpose of this mailing list is not to fight about words but to help
others who have issues.

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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Amin Jacek Pedziwiater,ASUSCOREURUS,C:IBMM
Sure, Mr. Martin, so sure. 
 
 
 
 
-------Original Message-------
 
Date: 6/20/2017 2:31:13 PM
Subject: Re: Open Office Writer Critique
 
 
On 20/06/17 5:04 PM, Larry Gusaas wrote:
> On 2017-06-20, 12:32 AM Martin Groenescheij wrote:
>
>> Well, you started to use the word Critique in the subject.
>> According to the dictionary this word means "the art of criticism"
>> and criticism is "a severe or unfavorable judgement".
>
> That is not a good definition of critique.
> From Oxford Dictionary of English:
>
>    critique|krɪˈtiːk|nouna detailed analysis and assessment of
> something, especially a
>    literary, philosophical, or political theory:a critique of Marxist
> historicism.verb(critiques,critiquing,critiqued)[withobject]evaluate
> (a theory orpractice)
>    in adetailedand analytical way:the authors critique the methods
> andpracticesused in
>    theresearch.ORIGINmid 17thcentury(as a noun): fromFrench, based
> onGreekkritikē
>    tekhnē‘criticalart’.
>
>
Different Dictionaries have different descriptions / explanations of
Critique, but they all come down to criticising something.
The Original Poster only expressed his frustration he did not asked for
help.
The purpose of this mailing list is not to fight about words but to help
others who have issues.
 
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For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
 
 
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Re: Open Office Writer Critique

Larry Gusaas-4
In reply to this post by Martin Groenescheij


On 2017-06-20, 6:31 AM Martin Groenescheij wrote:

>
>
> On 20/06/17 5:04 PM, Larry Gusaas wrote:
>> On 2017-06-20, 12:32 AM Martin Groenescheij wrote:
>>
>>> Well, you started to use the word Critique in the subject.
>>> According to the dictionary this word means "the art of criticism" and criticism is "a
>>> severe or unfavorable judgement".
>>
>> That is not a good definition of critique.
>> From Oxford Dictionary of English:
>>
>>    critique|krɪˈtiːk|nouna detailed analysis and assessment of something, especially a
>>    literary, philosophical, or political theory:a critique of Marxist
>> historicism.verb(critiques,critiquing,critiqued)[withobject]evaluate (a theory orpractice)
>>    in adetailedand analytical way:the authors critique the methods andpracticesused in
>>    theresearch.ORIGINmid 17thcentury(as a noun): fromFrench, based onGreekkritikē
>>    tekhnē‘criticalart’.
>>
>>
> Different Dictionaries have different descriptions / explanations of Critique, but they all
> come down to criticising something.

No, they do not. A critique is not about criticizing something. Here are some synonyms (note
that criticize isn't on the list).

    critique
    noun
    he produced a critique of North American culture: analysis, evaluation, assessment,
    appraisal, appreciation, review, write-up; criticism, critical essay, textual examination,
    commentary, study, treatise, discourse, exposition, disquisition, account, exegesis

> The Original Poster only expressed his frustration he did not asked for help.

True. He also misused critique.

> The purpose of this mailing list is not to fight about words but to help others who have issues.

And if you misuse words communication is impossible.


--
_________________________________

Larry I. Gusaas
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan Canada
Website: http://larry-gusaas.com
"An artist is never ahead of his time but most people are far behind theirs." - Edgard Varese

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