Possible Corporate installation

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Possible Corporate installation

Russ Hayes
Good morning,


I'm writing to confirm how we can move forward with Open Office for a project we are working on for the State of California.  We are a subcontractor to Xerox and are configuring/loading both mobile and fixed computers for deployment across the state.  They've asked us to install OpenOffice on each machine prior to delivery to the state throughout the rest of the year.


As an Open Source program, is there any open source agreement we need to have signed before we move forward with this?  Or, does the download of the software form the agreement to adhere to Open Source requirements?  Again, this is a State of CA implementation....we're being extra careful to make sure we don't run into a problem later on and just wanted to confirm how we move forward.


Thank you in advance,


Russell A. Hayes

Shade and Putnam
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Re: Possible Corporate installation

James Plante
I cannot speak for AOO, and I am not an attorney anywhere. What I would do if I were in your position is to print out the AOO license for the version that you’re using; write a statement of your circumstances and what you’ve been asked to do; then take it to a California lawyer, and ask for a letter of opinion.

Having that letter in your file will give you some ammunition against lawsuits or other enforcement action. That’s the best you can do, since AFAIK there is NO management of AOO that can speak with executive authority with respect to the software.


> On Mar 30, 2017, at 9:14 AM, Russ Hayes <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Good morning,
>
>
> I'm writing to confirm how we can move forward with Open Office for a project we are working on for the State of California.  We are a subcontractor to Xerox and are configuring/loading both mobile and fixed computers for deployment across the state.  They've asked us to install OpenOffice on each machine prior to delivery to the state throughout the rest of the year.
>
>
> As an Open Source program, is there any open source agreement we need to have signed before we move forward with this?  Or, does the download of the software form the agreement to adhere to Open Source requirements?  Again, this is a State of CA implementation....we're being extra careful to make sure we don't run into a problem later on and just wanted to confirm how we move forward.
>
>
> Thank you in advance,
>
>
> Russell A. Hayes
>
> Shade and Putnam


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Re: Possible Corporate installation

James Knott
OO is open source software, which means it's available for anyone to
use, business or not.  This has long been the practice & right for open
source software.

On 03/30/2017 10:32 AM, James Plante wrote:

> I cannot speak for AOO, and I am not an attorney anywhere. What I would do if I were in your position is to print out the AOO license for the version that you’re using; write a statement of your circumstances and what you’ve been asked to do; then take it to a California lawyer, and ask for a letter of opinion.
>
> Having that letter in your file will give you some ammunition against lawsuits or other enforcement action. That’s the best you can do, since AFAIK there is NO management of AOO that can speak with executive authority with respect to the software.
>
>
>> On Mar 30, 2017, at 9:14 AM, Russ Hayes <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> Good morning,
>>
>>
>> I'm writing to confirm how we can move forward with Open Office for a project we are working on for the State of California.  We are a subcontractor to Xerox and are configuring/loading both mobile and fixed computers for deployment across the state.  They've asked us to install OpenOffice on each machine prior to delivery to the state throughout the rest of the year.
>>
>>
>> As an Open Source program, is there any open source agreement we need to have signed before we move forward with this?  Or, does the download of the software form the agreement to adhere to Open Source requirements?  Again, this is a State of CA implementation....we're being extra careful to make sure we don't run into a problem later on and just wanted to confirm how we move forward.
>>
>>
>> Thank you in advance,
>>
>>
>> Russell A. Hayes
>>
>> Shade and Putnam
>
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> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
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Re: Possible Corporate installation

toki
In reply to this post by James Plante
On 03/30/2017 02:32 PM, James Plante wrote:
> What I would do if I were in your position is to print out the AOO license for the version that you’re using;
> write a statement of your circumstances and what you’ve been asked to
do; then take it to a California lawyer,
> and ask for a letter of opinion.

I'd recommend taking printouts of all licenses and contracts that are
related to the project, and have that lawyer go through them, to ensure
that using AOo will be kosher. I've come across a couple of contracts
that, for all practical purposes, prohibited the use of FLOSS. I've also
come across a couple of closed source licenses that make the use of
FLOSS problematic.

> Having that letter in your file will give you some ammunition against lawsuits or other enforcement action.

+1

I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice.

jonathon

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Re: Possible Corporate installation

Dave Fisher
Sure you should take it to a lawyer to be sure, but you truly are free to use Apache OpenOffice for your stated purposes.

(1) Apache OpenOffice is a project of the Apache Software Foundation and is managed by a set of volunteers who are the Apache OpenOffice Project Management Committee - https://openoffice.apache.org <https://openoffice.apache.org/>
(2) The Apache Software Foundation makes all releases under the Apache License 2.0 - http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0 <http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0>
(3) The Apache Software Foundation is a volunteer run non-profit - http://www.apache.org/foundation/ <http://www.apache.org/foundation/>
(4) The project has a page of known support resources at http://www.openoffice.org/support/index.html <http://www.openoffice.org/support/index.html>
(5) OpenOffice release are made in source form with build instructions. https://openoffice.apache.org/downloads.html <https://openoffice.apache.org/downloads.html>
(6) Installation packages (Convenience binaries) are made available by the project for Windows, MacOS and Linux. https://www.openoffice.org/download/index.html <https://www.openoffice.org/download/index.html>

FYI - I am also a resident of California, a member of the Apache Software Foundation and the OpenOffice PMC.

If you want advice on packaging then please consider joining the dev list - https://openoffice.apache.org/mailing-lists.html#development-mailing-list-public <https://openoffice.apache.org/mailing-lists.html#development-mailing-list-public>

Regards,
Dave

> On Mar 30, 2017, at 9:33 AM, toki <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> On 03/30/2017 02:32 PM, James Plante wrote:
>> What I would do if I were in your position is to print out the AOO license for the version that you’re using;
>> write a statement of your circumstances and what you’ve been asked to
> do; then take it to a California lawyer,
>> and ask for a letter of opinion.
>
> I'd recommend taking printouts of all licenses and contracts that are
> related to the project, and have that lawyer go through them, to ensure
> that using AOo will be kosher. I've come across a couple of contracts
> that, for all practical purposes, prohibited the use of FLOSS. I've also
> come across a couple of closed source licenses that make the use of
> FLOSS problematic.
>
>> Having that letter in your file will give you some ammunition against lawsuits or other enforcement action.
>
> +1
>
> I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice.
>
> jonathon
>
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> To unsubscribe, e-mail: [hidden email]
> For additional commands, e-mail: [hidden email]
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